Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics - Men’s 12.5K Pursuit biathlon  » Sport  »
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  • It's just amazing to think about the strength it takes to do the shooting
  • That's a lot to ask, and it was clear from the number of misses on the 3rd and 4th range shooting segments that it is definitely not easy

    • by Orrymain
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      The Men’s 12.5K Pursuit, aka: the biathlon, is really an interesting sport. I’m not sure of its origins. Perhaps it’s hunting related, but it requires fast skiing as well as fast and accurate rifle shooting. Basically, you ski a while and then you reach a shooting range. The first two times, you shoot from a lying down position. You have to hit the small target five times. If you don’t, you take a penalty lap around a short lap around the range, while those who make it clean, continue on for their regular lap. On the final two visits to the range,

      the shooting is done by a standing position.

      It’s just amazing to think about the strength it takes to do the shooting. You’re tired from the skiing and then you have to steady yourself enough to make those shots. That’s a lot to ask, and it was clear from the number of misses on the 3rd and 4th range shooting segments that it is definitely not easy.

      Pursuit is more exciting than you think. You do have to pay close attention to who hits and misses on the shooting or you’ll get lost fast. However, having to take a penalty lap doesn’t mean you’re out of ...


      • it at all. Ski fast, and you can still do well. Still, it’s not the racing for the finish line that is the big drama here. In fact, that seemed to lacked spark in this event. However, it’s the transitioning from skiing to shooting and then back to skiing that is the thrill.

        In these Vancouver 2010 Winter Games, this biathlon began with controversy. Two of the competitors were started prematurely. Both men were out of order and thus competing in a foreign order. It confused just about everyone. For a long time, it was hard to tell what position he was

        really in because the times were off. It wasn’t until the last shooting event that the officials had finally adjusted the times.

        Sweden’s Bjorn Ferry won the gold. America’s Jeremy Teela had a shot for a while, but his mis-shoots on the range kept him from being in the hunt. He, however, was one of the two involved in the incorrect starts. The other was Canada’s Jean Phillippe Leguellec.

        You have to wonder how this affected the minds of the competitors. It can’t be changed, and true sportsmen rise above it. Still, the early start times show a nasty shadow over the otherwise intriguing competition.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 351602994491128/k2311a0216/2.16.10
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