Wyre Forest, England  » Travel  »
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  • The Wyre Forest is one of my very favourite places to visit in England, and I think it is rather a shame that it is not better known
  • Unfortunately it is not quite so easy to reach by public transport and you will need to study timetables, websites and maps quite carefully if you intend to rely on buses
  • The best place to start if you are new to the forest is the official Wyre Forest Visitor Centre on thee edge of the woodland, which rather handily lies right next to the A456, on the northern side
  • I can certainly recommend this cafe for its warm baguettes, which are extremely nice and a fantastic winter warmer in cold weather
  • As long as you do not expect to be able to do very much more than walk, take photographs and simply enjoy a beautiful area of countryside, you are almost certain to have a very pleasant experience here

    • by fredhound
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      The Wyre Forest is one of my very favourite places to visit in England, and I think it is rather a shame that it is not better known. It is made up of six thousand acres of woodland straddling the border between Worcestershire and Shropshire, about 20 miles west of Birmingham and easily accessible by car along the A456 main road from Kidderminster. Unfortunately it is not quite so easy to reach by public transport and you will need to study timetables, websites and maps quite carefully if you intend to rely on buses.

      The best place to start if you are new to the forest is the official Wyre Forest Visitor Centre on thee edge of the woodland, which rather handily lies right next to the A456, on the northern side. It is quite well signposted, but you should keep a lookout for the entrance itself, which can be a little bit overgrown in the summer. Here you will find a fairly large car parking area set out among the trees, though this is sometimes muddy and it can be very crowded on a summer weekend or Bank Holiday. It is VERY popular with dog walkers!

      The Visitor Centre itself is a


      solid and attractive wooden building, easily found by a short walk from the car park. It contains a shop where you can buy both practical products such as maps and outdoor clothing (gloves, for example) as well as a small but friendly cafe which sells soups, sandwiches and snacks. I can certainly recommend this cafe for its warm baguettes, which are extremely nice and a fantastic winter warmer in cold weather. If it is hot, though, you can sit outside and buy ice cream from a window. There are also toilets to the side of the building, which I usually find clean and well looked after.

      In the last year or two, there have been two major developments on this site which may affect your enjoyment of it for better or worse. Firstly, a largish area near the Visitor Centre has been cordoned off for the exclusive use of educational groups from schools and so on. This means that a popular former path is no longer accessible. I don’t really like the total ban on anyone else entering this part of the site at any time - I think it’s frankly a bit paranoid - but luckily there are plenty of other ...


      • paths which are still open, and to be fair a new route has been laid down which is suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs.

        The second new development in the area is the construction of a “Go Ape!” area. This is something I have never tried myself as it scares the life out of cowards like me - but it is basically a big adventure playground for adults, with rope slides and treetop walks and so on. Personally I don’t like it very much, as it makes this area of the forest extremely noisy, and I think it has definitely hurt the relatively peaceful ambience that used to exist. It is still possible to get away from the noise if you are prepared to walk a little bit further afield, however.

        If you are looking for a more tranquil experience, however, then you should do as I do and get away from the main centre, by seeking out one of the less well known parts of the forest. One example is the Hawkbatch area on the north-eastern side of the woodland, which has far less development around it and is simply a quiet place to enjoy a forest walk. Earnwood Copse is another example

        of an area with a formal car park but little else. If you are willing to walk from Bewdley, however, you can find some even more peaceful walks where you can often go an hour without seeing anyone else.

        Personally I much prefer these gentle, remoter walks to the Visitor Centre. On these you can hope to see some of Wyre Forest’s rarer wildlife such as adders, and you may very well hear buzzards calling as they circle above the trees. Butterflies are very common in the right conditions, including some rare species. Even if you are not particularly interested in animals, I am sure you will enjoy the fresh air and the escape from the usual rat race and its concrete enclosures. I certainly do, and I think visiting the forest regularly (in the summer, at least) even makes me feel healthier.

        As I am sure you can tell from what I have written above, I thoroughly recommend a trip to the Wyre Forest. As long as you do not expect to be able to do very much more than walk, take photographs and simply enjoy a beautiful area of countryside, you are almost certain to have a very pleasant experience here.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 38502981670528/k2311a025/2.5.10
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