Prang Sam Yot, Thailand  » Travel  »
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Lopburi, Thailand
  • None of that matters though, at least it didn't to me and my friends, because the real reason to go there is to see, or rather, to experience, the droves of macaque monkeys that dominate the city of Lopburi, especially in the temple area
  • I strongly recommend visiting the monkeys of Lopburi, because it's truly a unique experience

    • by Tracy Reel
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      Prang Sam Yot is a Khmer temple in the province of Lopburi Thailand, in the capital city by the same name, Lopburi.

      The temple is a Buddhist shrine with three towers, or “prangs,” that were originally built to represent Hindu Gods Brahma, Vishnu, and Shiva.

      None of that matters though, at least it didn’t to me and my friends, because the real reason to go there is to see, or rather, to experience, the droves of macaque monkeys that dominate the city of Lopburi, especially in the temple area.

      It’s a short walk from the train station to the temple, and the first thing you notice about the town is that the monkeys are everywhere: running along power lines, squabbling on the sides of buildings and grabbing things from shops and running. We tried to feed


      a couple of them some hot dogs, but they snubbed their little monkey noses at the cherished American treat. Spoiled monkeys.

      The temple area is a big open space in the middle of the bustling city and when you walk in you are given a stick, which my friend Jenny referred to as her monkey beating stick, in case the monkeys get overwhelming.You’re also given a bag of seeds, for a small fee, to feed the monkeys. So you feed them, and then you swat at them with a stick. This experience was almost as cool as one might imagine it to be. Almost.

      I laughed when I got my monkey beating stick, but I soon learned that I would be lost without it. Immediately inside of the temple a monkey ran up the back ...


      • of my leg and jumped on my head. Aaaagh! I shook it off, but soon found my head a springing-off point for several other monkeys. It was crazy! Once I was finally free from monkey attacks, I realized I was being stalked by an old one-eyed monkey, one of the biggest ones there. He was eyeballing my seeds, so I held one out to him. He grabbed my hand, bit my knuckle and stole my seeds all in one swoop. Sly monkey.

        And so it went. The monkeys were relentless. The guide book says not to try to touch them, but I was having fun tickling some of the babies. Finally though, I couldn’t stand being covered in monkeys another minute longer. I was in the corner of the temple yard, done with the monkeys and

        trying to be incognito and wait for my friends, when a tiny monkey ran up to me and bit me on the arm! Bad monkey. It broke the skin. That was all it took to condemn me to a series of weekly rabies shots that left me seeking out clinics in every new town I visited in Thailand. Yick.

        I strongly recommend visiting the monkeys of Lopburi, because it’s truly a unique experience. However, I also strongly caution against antagonizing the monkeys. My friend Jenny thinks I was bitten in retaliation for the tickling. That might be true. Also, if you go, make sure any backpack your wearing is zipped tight and things in your pockets aren’t accessible to tiny monkey hands. They’ll go for anything, and if they get it you may never see it again.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 38202976590628/k2311a022/2.2.10
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