Samorost (Amanita Design, 2002)  » Games  »
4.5
1 votes
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  • I was never particularly interested in video and/or web games, so I never even sought them after I got an internet connection - even though friends occasionally sent me links to web games they thought were interesting
  • I don't think it's suitable for hyperactive types who click furiously all around the screen as if their goal were to get out of there ASAP

    • by Pretty Polly
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      I was never particularly interested in video and/or web games, so I never even sought them after I got an internet connection - even though friends occasionally sent me links to web games they thought were interesting.

      Then one day, when I was frankly bored, I finally clicked on a link that led to an oddly - and, I must admit, intriguingly - named game: SAMOROST. (Later I found out that means “driftwood” in Czech.)

      What attracted me and so kept my interest for more than a few seconds were the beautiful graphics and the overall surreal feel of the “landscape”, just whimsical enough to be funny and interesting.

      The game had no instructions


      (or I didn’t notice them), so I had to find out for myself what I was supposed to do. And at first it was almost infuriating! But the funny voices emitted by the characters when I clicked on them and the sheer mystery of it all kept me interested.

      As I finally managed to click my way out of the first screen (or “level”), I was already very much “into” the game. And I was very delighted to see that the next screens were even more beautiful to the eye. I was also pleased to see there was no hint of mindless violence and that its “philosophy” was peaceful and kindly, yet ...


      • humorous. (The main characters are a whimsical tiny figure dressed in a hooded white suit and his dog who travel in a “rocket” - modelled on a “spam” tin can - from planet to planet.)

        To play Samorost successfully you need: a) good eyesight, and b) patience enough to really get “into” the game and think.

        I don’t think it’s suitable for hyperactive types who click furiously all around the screen as if their goal were to get out of there ASAP.

        Needless to say, it is also hardly appropriate for those who find pleasure in exploding things and aggressive gaming. It requires intelligence and a certain “empathy”, to guess the

        intentions behind each situation. As such, it can be very challenging - but oh so rewarding!

        And there is another component that separates Samorost from most other such games: the music. It is SO good that I actually downloaded it and often use it during work or for inspiration.

        Nowadays, of course, Samorost is a world-famous classic, and its visual style has inspired many imitators around the world. Best of all, it’s still available - for free - on the web.

        N.B. There is also a second part (with even better music!) - which, unlike the first part can only partly be played for free (although the full version isn’t expensive) - and a new game, called Machinarium.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 28102974950428/k2311a021/2.1.10
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