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  • However, I would not consider it one of the better works in its field
  • I can't really recommend this book unless you are truly interested in the subject, simply because of its dryness

    • by fredhound
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      Micro Computers for Business and Home is a real window into the past of computing. It was published (by the British company Paperfronts) way back in 1983, and although its author A. D. T. Fryer has not gone on to become a well known name in the industry it still offers some insights into how computers were perceived more than a quarter of a century ago. However, I would not consider it one of the better works in

      its field.

      The book is a fairly think paperback of just 126 pages, but this is almost all text (and in fairly small print) so I would suggest that the amount of information given is higher than you would expect given that number. The book is divided into seven sections, which are clearly aimed at the absolute beginner seeing as chapter 2 is called “Understanding A Demonstration”! However, the 7th chapter, “Coding”, is quite a bit more advanced.

      Fryer is ...


      • a reasonably good author, though not in the same league as the great names of 1980s popularisation such as Ian Sinclair. His style can be a little bit dry at times, and there is no humour to speak of (a bit of a depressing discovery) but it is quite clear if often a bit long-winded. The sample programs looked at and explained are almost all simple business-type applications such as budget control, although there is a brief look
        at the famous “3D Monster Maze” game.

        There is no real reason to seek out this book unless you have a considerable interest in old computers, and even then it would not really be worth paying more than a small amount. There is little sense here of the excitement of the times, and auction sites will certainly offer some much more evocative publications. I can’t really recommend this book unless you are truly interested in the subject, simply because of its dryness.




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