‘Four Roses’ Bourbon
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  • It is a lighter bourbon than Jack Daniel’s or ‘Old Grandad’ and it is best drunk on its own, in my opinion
  • A couple of glasses will be much less noticeable than with a heavier bourbon like Jack Daniel’s or Wild Turkey in my experience

    • by Andrew Gray
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      I am a sucker for a decent drink, whether it be a good beer, a pleasant wine, or a glass of something warming on a cold, winter’s day. In this case, many years ago, I discovered a drink which is available over here, but not widely so. This is a delightful American whiskey called ‘Four Roses’.

      Generally, in the UK, there are the usual big names like Jack Daniel’s which advertise on TV and have a very much higher profile than other bourbons. Perhaps because the Scotch Whisky industry is so big, there may be a misconception that other drinks can’t squeeze in. That is wrong, I believe. The truth of the matter is that Scotch whisky is


      an older person’s drink, because it tastes quite different from many blander drinks that can be diluted with a soft drink like Coke. That isn’t the case with the likes of ‘Four Roses’, however.

      In what way does ‘Four Roses’ differ from some of the other drinks on the market? Well, it’s got a good flavour, for one thing. It is a lighter bourbon than Jack Daniel’s or ‘Old Grandad’ and it is best drunk on its own, in my opinion. Some bourbons like Jack Daniel’s have a very powerful flavour and react well to the addition of a drink like Coke (though I wouldn’t adulterate it myself). ‘Four Roses’, however, has some characteristics which bring it closer ...


      • to some Old World whiskies that might at first be plain.

        It is a little-known fact that whisky is also distilled in Brittany. That is the finger of land that sticks out of France in the north-west They have several which are all different. To my surprise, I discovered one that tasted exactly like the lighter, more lemony bourbons. I put ‘Four Roses’ in that class. It has the same classic bourbon taste that I discovered in Brittany which tallies to some extent with the lighter Scotch whiskies from the north-east of Scotland (eg Smith’s ‘Glenlivet’). The light colour and lemony taste (often described as ‘fruity) and bouquet are very similar. Equally the fact is that both

        would be drowned and utterly wasted by having a strongly-flavoured additive poured in. It is a pungent drink, despite being light. It has a taste which is that faintly ‘gluey’ distinct bourbon tang that makes it a completely different spirit from Scotch whisky or Irish whiskey. Very enjoyable indeed.

        In conclusion, ‘Four Roses’ is a bourbon that has a classic simplicity about it. It isn’t ‘in your face’ or aggressive at all. There is, perhaps, a certain feminine decorousness about it, both in its ‘nose’, to use a wine term and colour. It is also a clean drink. A couple of glasses will be much less noticeable than with a heavier bourbon like Jack Daniel’s or Wild Turkey in my experience.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 272501964410131/k2311a0125/1.25.10
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