Lost Angel movie
4.0
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  • I actually enjoyed that scene quite a bit

    • by Orrymain
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      At the tender age of six, Margaret O’Brien had top starring billing in 1943’s Lost Angel, a story about a girl dispassionately named Alpha who is raised by a group of scientists without the frills of fun and fairytales. After she’s questioned by a reporter who tells her that outside there are all kinds of magic and dragons, Alpha gets curious and sneaks

      away to discover the truth.

      The story may ultimately be predictable, but it’s so much fun to watch. Alpha attaches herself to the stereotypical reporter, a man’s man who is high on smoking, drinking, the fights, and women, though he has a girlfriend. Never the less, he runs from commitment; that is, until Alpha captures his heart. I actually like his revelation ...


      • towards the end on the train. That was well done.

        I probably would have liked to have seen more of a complete ending than the film shows. It essentially wraps it up in all of ten seconds and that’s it, Alpha is away from the scientists and now has a mommy and daddy.

        Acting wise, James Craig does okay as the reporter who finds

        himself an instant dad. Marsha Hunt is good as the girlfriend, but for me, I had more fun watching Keenan Wynn as a gangster type who falls under Alpha’s charms. There’s also a small role for Robert Blake. I actually enjoyed that scene quite a bit. It was very cute.

        Overall, Lost Angel kept my attention. O’Brien, as always, was captivating.




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