Pilot P - 700 pen  » Other  »
4.0
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  • It was neat and I could write with it, but I was still young enough to be unfaithful and I found my ideal pen one day when I was in a stationery shop
  • I prefer blue, so that was the next requirement and the third point was that it shouldn’t be Japanese
  • Not because I don’t like Japanese quality, but you can’t let them think they’re the best at making everything, because they’ll get terribly big-headed about it
  • However, it did help me write legibly and it was in blue, so I decided that two out of three wasn’t too bad and bought it
  • However, with these few exceptions, it is a pen I enjoy using and I am sufficiently confident to write letters to complete strangers using it

    • by Andrew HN Gray
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      For many years, I was convinced that the only pen I could write with in anything approaching a legible style, was a fine-tipped, black Bic biro. I had come to this conclusion because my handwriting was so illegible when I was a schoolboy that no one could read it. It flowed over the page in an untidy rush of words, cramped and squeezed together, as if there wasn’t any room on the page, or sprawling like a drunken sailor all over the page so that it looked as if an exercise in English literary criticism was actually some kind of imperial expansion, with my words the soldiers who were conquering an empire of paper.

      As I moved on from school to university, I went through all kinds of pens. I even had a brief fling with a fountain


      pen. These had been the only permitted means of preserving one’s immortal words on the sacrosanct page of one’s school ‘jotter’ or writing book. However, these rules which had stood for at least a century were gradually relaxed at the same time as we began to grow our hair far longer than school regulations permitted. And we got away with it.

      Fountain pens are mucky beasts when all is said and done. They are incontinent. Put one in your pocket, looking all sweetness and light and you will find that it has had an ‘accident’ when you weren’t looking. Your jacket and shirt are now dyed a dark shade of blue, but only on the left breast, of course. The point of using these antique and obsolete mechanisms defeated me at school and in later life. They’re only ...


      • good for signing peace treaties with.

        That was what drew me to the Bic pen. It was neat and I could write with it, but I was still young enough to be unfaithful and I found my ideal pen one day when I was in a stationery shop. Where better, you may ask? It was called a Pilot P – 700. I had run out of Bics and I was wanting a pen that would control my unmannerly handwriting. I was working in business and kept a telephone log by hand. I wanted a pen that would help me to write legibly, so it needed a fine tip, but not too fine. I prefer blue, so that was the next requirement and the third point was that it shouldn’t be Japanese. Not because I

        don’t like Japanese quality, but you can’t let them think they’re the best at making everything, because they’ll get terribly big-headed about it. Anyway, I spotted a slim, elegant-looking pen and fell in love. I tried it and it wrote perfectly. I then discovered it was, in fact, Japanese. However, it did help me write legibly and it was in blue, so I decided that two out of three wasn’t too bad and bought it.

        I must admit that Pilot pens aren’t perfect. I get the odd one that starts writing and then simply refuses to go on doing so. It doesn’t seem to matter how loudly I shout at it, it just won’t respond. However, with these few exceptions, it is a pen I enjoy using and I am sufficiently confident to write letters to complete strangers using it.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 121201950190531/k2311a0112/1.12.10
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