Innes & Gunn Beer
4.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • There was one a few years ago that was called ‘Elephant Beer’, I believe
  • When I first heard its name, I thought it was Innocent Gun, which seemed an odd name
  • I was impressed, as were my friends who had suggested it
  • It must cost them a lot, but look at what it does for their beer

    • by Andrew HN Gray
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      Once in a while, something different comes on the market and makes a bit of a splash. I suppose you could think of Google in the respect. It outshone the competition in a big way and none have ever quite come up to scratch ever since. Perhaps Champagne is another example and a little more relevant in this case, because I am talking about beer here. Not just any ordinary beer, but a beer which is unique.

      Now, you may have heard of other unique beers. There was one a few years ago that was called ‘Elephant Beer’, I believe. I am not sure why. However, its unique quality was that it was half frozen and the water turned to ice, which was then extracted. The booze that was left, was then bottled and it made the strongest beer in the


      world. I tried it. It was, in my opinion, undrinkable.

      In the last couple of months, perhaps to celebrate the attempt by the Scottish governing party to increase the price of a unit of alcohol to something that would discourage young people from drinking too much (!), a couple of bright young Scots lads brewed a beer that is as strong as whisky! Can you imagine it? Of course, the authorities didn’t want to rock the boat and made it compulsory for all Scots to buy a bottle.

      Sorry. That’s a lie, in fact. The Scottish Government immediately cracked down on them and they aren’t allowed to brew it.

      Now to a happier tale. This is the story of a beer which is brewed in Scotland and which has raised a lot of interest, because it is quite unique and well worth ...


      • trying. Indeed, you may already have done so. It’s called Innes & Gunn. When I first heard its name, I thought it was Innocent Gun, which seemed an odd name. I soon found out what it is really called and had a drink. I was impressed, as were my friends who had suggested it. They were not only Scots, but also a German girl who is usually pretty keen on sticking to German beers. She made an exception in this case.

        I was even more convinced that this beer was worth telling people about when a Canadian cousin came over and he is really into this stuff. I had to buy some specially for him. He couldn’t come to Edinburgh and not have any Innes & Gunn, he said. How right he was too.

        What is so special about this beer?

        Well, it’s simple. You will already be familiar about the aged oak barrels that are used to store bourbon? If so, then you probably know that they are used by some Scotch Whisky distillers. Others use sherry casks to age their whisky. However, Innes & Gunn got the idea of using them for beer! They leave it to age for 77 days before it’s bottled. Amazingly, they only use those barrels once, because they reckon they lose the flavour after that. It must cost them a lot, but look at what it does for their beer! The oak barrels give the beer a smooth, vanilla flavour and a complexity of taste that I can vouch for. This is a connoisseur beer, but it isn’t at connoisseur prices. Get it while you can. This beer doesn’t hang around, waiting to be sold. Cheers!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 271201950160531/k2311a0112/1.12.10
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