Rhodesian Ridgeback dog
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  • I think it is a beautiful type of dog, but it is really important not to decide to have a Rhodesian ridgeback based on their looks
  • If you want to be sure you can let your dog walk without a leash in the woods, a ridgeback is not the best of ideas (if you do not plan on actually using them to hunt)
  • Which was fine, she was really gentle with the little girl, no problem at all
  • But if you want a ridgeback you have to consider it
  • Frieda loves food…And she’s not picky (although my gorgonzola, coffee, and whiskey are favourite if I’m not careful to keep it away from her)

    • by feather13
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      For over a year I am the proud owner of a Rhodesian Ridgebacklady, her name is Frieda. I always wanted a dog, and I got to know this particular breed because neighbours of a friend of mine had two ridgebacks. I think it is a beautiful type of dog, but it is really important not to decide to have a Rhodesian ridgeback based on their looks. It is an African breed, bred for lionhunting. Which means they have a set of characteristics that you should be well aware of before you decide. It is a large dog, and although they are slender (males tend to be more muscular than the ladies) they are very powerful. And very, very swift. Because it is a dog that was meant to hunt, you have to be careful with deer etc.

      Of course there are ridgebacks who don’t have this characteristic, but if you get a puppy, you will not know until later on. If you want to be sure you can let your dog walk without a leash in the woods, a ridgeback is not the best of ideas (if you do not plan on actually using them to hunt). Frieda is quite good when I tell her to


      stay with me when we see deer…but…the trouble is when they start running. When I see them before she does and keep contact with her it’s fine. But when she sees them first and they have started to run, her ears are stuffed with cottonwool…She’ll go after them. That’s why I always have a 15m leash for her, just to be sure. If you are not prepared to take the huntingtalent into account, don’t chose a ridgeback.

      And it’s not fair to be angry with them because of it. Their job was to keep the lion there until the hunters arrived. When the lion stays put, Frieda would as well, but when they start to run, it’s clear she’ll go after it and try to stop it. Because they hunt in packs, and kind of do the work before the hunter arrives, they are a very independent breed. They are not used to take orders in the sense that a lot of other dogs do. They are used to decide on their own (which can be a bit difficult sometimes if it’s not what you want). They do take orders, but more in a working together sort of way.

      They like to be a team with their

      owner. When you get that kind of a connection with your ridgeback, you have a friend for life. And a protector for life as well. In general they are very protective of their pack (which would be you/the family). Which can be a good thing, but you have to be very aware that it’s not always positive. In general they announce visitors friendly, but at a distance. It is not a type of dog that is immediately friends with anyone.

      In general…because Frieda is, she loves people, and it doesn’t matter if it’s my friends, or random people in the street. But I got Frieda exactly because of her protectionskills. She was in a family with a little girl of about 4 years old. Which was fine, she was really gentle with the little girl, no problem at all. The trouble was when friends of the little girl came over to play. Frieda apparently decided they were a danger to her and growled at them. In the end the parents decided it was too dangerous (you don’t want a fully grown ridgeback take a bite of a little girl).

      Because I don’t have any children it is fine. But if you want a ridgeback you have ...


      • Rhodesian Ridgeback dog
      to consider it. It might be no problem, but it is not uncommon. And personally, I would not advise having a ridgeback when you have small children. Because even though they are usually sweet to children. It is a big dog (the males go up to 70cm these days…), and they can be a bit clumsy sometimes. Which means a small child is easily run over in the heat of the game.

      And although at home Frieda is very quiet (sleeping, preferably on the sofa, most of the time), she needs a lot of running as well. And not only that, she needs mindwork. Ridgebacks tend to get bored real quick. If you want a dog bringing back a ball or a stick 20 times…do not get a ridgeback. I already read it before I got Frieda, but she is the typical ridgeback. If I throw a stick, she’ll go after it and bring it back. If I throw it a again, she’ll look a bit confused, but might go after it again.

      But when I throw the stick a third time she will look at me as if she were saying: You’re not serious are you?! If you throw it away again, you obviously don’t need it

      anymore. They want to be useful. So the mantrailingcourse we did was perfect for her. She really had to work there. And of course the treat she gets when she finds the person is a very good motivator, because as most ridgebacks: Frieda loves food…And she’s not picky (although my gorgonzola, coffee, and whiskey are favourite if I’m not careful to keep it away from her). The good thing about that is that it makes training them a lot easier. They’ll do anything for food… One other thing to consider…If you live somewhere where it’s winter most of the year, a ridgeback might not be the best choice.

      It is an African dog, they do not have much hair to cover them (on their stomach practically none). So they get cold easily. And Frieda (like most ridgebacks) HATES rain. She has a jacket now to protect her from the cold and rain. Without it, there is no way she is going outside the house… I think it looks stupid, but at least it’s better than having to stay in every time it is raining… All in all a ridgeback can be a wonderful companion, if you are prepared to take into account all the characteristics that are likely to come with the ridgebackpackage.



0
Shelby Sanchez says :

re : I think it is a beautiful type of dog, but it is really important not to decide to have a Rhodesian ridgeback based on their looks
I thik they’re a beautiful breed and if you are a type of person that goes off the looks of a dog then this is the dog for you.

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