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  • Genoa enjoyed its best days we discovered historically during the 1200s
  • I was greatly impressed by the antiques and frescoes the museum had on exhibit dating from the 1600s to 1800s
  • Additionally should you decide to visit I suggest you take a “peek” at the Throne Room and the Hall of Mirrors

    • by DawnMichel
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      Genoa is approximately one hundred twenty miles from Rome. It is considered the country’s primary port on the Mediterranean and is as important as Marseilles within Europe. Genoa enjoyed its best days we discovered historically during the 1200s: It was during this period of time that the city easily rivaled Venice. Its colonies during the thirteenth century extended from the Euphrates to the Barbary Coast. The city’s famous son was Andrea Doria who took Genoa out of the clutches of French domination during the early portion of the 1500s. Genoa is the capital of the region of Liguria and one of the country’s most prosperous cities. Other industries important to the city’s economy outside of shipping include: Communications, banking, insurance and electronics. The sites of primary interest are between the town’s two rail stations: Stazione Principe on the western edge near Genoa’s port; and Stazione Brignole which is located northeast. The first site I and my travel partner visited was Civic Gallery of the Red Palace located at Via Garibaldi 18. Admission is moderate and hours of operation are Tuesday and Thursday through Friday 9:00 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. ; Wednesday and Saturday 9:00 a.

      m. to 7:00 p. m. ; and Sunday 10:00a. m. up to 6:00p. m. You can access the site by boarding the number 18, 20, 30 or 34 bus. The 1600s palace was once the residence of Brignole-Sale—an aristocratic family that established the Dynasty of the Genovese. The palace was bombed in World II however was subsequently restored. It now houses a good collection of paintings. In fact the art is highly extraordinary


      including works by Veronese; Guido Reni, Guercino and Sir Anthony Van Dyck. There are marvelous frescoes by Gregorio de Ferrari (Spring and Summer) and by Domenico Piola (Autumn and Winter).

      Ceramics and statuary were also on exhibit. Perhaps my favorite presentation was the beautiful gilded Baroque statues. Next we ventured across the street from the Red Palace to the White Palace aka the Palazzo Bianco. The Civic Museum of the White Palace (aka Museo Civico di Palazzo Bianco located at mail address Via Garibaldi II. ) There is a moderate charge for admission. Hours of operation are Tuesday and Thursday through Friday 9:00 a. m. to 7:00 p. m. ; and Sunday 10:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m.

      You may access the museum by way of the number 18, 23, 30 or 34 bus. The White Palace dates from the 1500s however its current appearance is due to the planning of later designers. The museum is designed to coincide with the most current trends in museum-styling. I noted the primary works of art such as Polittico della Cervara by Gerald David; and Jesus Blessing the Faithful by Memling. Further there were other outstanding works on exhibit by Peter Paul Rubens and Sir Anthony Van Dyck. Certainly the range of art was quite spectacular with paintings on exhibit by Zurbaran and Murillo. There was an entire area celebrating the works of Bernardo Strozzi. I particularly liked a garden scene by noted artist Alessandro Magnasco. The next site we visited was the National Gallery also known as Galleria Nazionale. The gallery is located at the Palazzo Spinola and the official ...


      • mail address is Piazza della Pellicceria 1. There is a moderate charge for admission. The hours of operation are 9:00 a. m.

        to 1:00 p. m. ; and Tuesday through Saturday 9:00 a. m. to 7:00 p. m. ; Sunday 2:00 p. m. to 7:00 p. m. You can access it by taking Bus 18, 20 30 or 34. The National Gallery provides its visitor with a very significant collection of paintings. Primary works include Guistizia by Giovanni Pisano; Ecce Homo by Antonello da Messina and Madonna in Prayer by Joos van Cleve.

        I was particularly pleased by what the museum had to offer in the way of decorative arts. Examples include silver, ceramics and furniture. The Grimaldi family designed the magnificent structure in the 1500s to be used as a residence. The Spinolas eventually took over ownership of the palatial dwelling. The fourth gallery we were delighted to visit was the Galleria di Palazzo Reale aka Royal Palace Gallery located at Via Baldi 10. Here there is also a very moderate charge for admission. The hours of operation are Sunday through Tuesday 9:00 a. m. to 1:45 p. m. ; and Wednesday through Saturday 9:00 a. m. to 6:30 p.

        m. You may access the gallery by way of bus 18, 19, or 20. The Royal Palace is a very brief stroll from Stazione Principe. Construction was begun on the palace during the mid-portion of the seventeenth century and the work continued until the early 1700s. Originally it was constructed for the Baldi family; subsequently it was sold to the Durazzos and later became one of the palatial estates in the early nineteenth

        century of the Savoias. King Charles Albert made many modifications to the interior aspect of the palace during the early part of the nineteenth century. Naturally the design of the original structure was changed significantly. Outside of the history of the palace, the gallery includes many significant examples of statuary as well as paintings. There are paintings by artists such as G. F. Romanelli, Van Dyck, Tintoretto, and L. Giordano. I was greatly impressed by the antiques and frescoes the museum had on exhibit dating from the 1600s to 1800s.

        Additionally should you decide to visit I suggest you take a “peek” at the Throne Room and the Hall of Mirrors.

        Our last site on our schedule was the Catterdrale di San Lorenzo and Campanile located at the Piazzo San Lorenzo, Via Tommaso Reggio 17. The admission price is moderate (and slightly higher than what we paid at the preceding galleries. ) The hours of operation are Monday through Saturday 9:00 a. m. to noon and 3:00 p. m. to 6:00 p. m. You may access it by taking Bus 42. One fact that stands out in my mind about Genoa is that it is well-known for its very “cool” medieval churches. The Catterdrale di San Lorenzo and Campanile clearly stands above the rest. The church was almost bombed to extinction during the Second World War however fortunately the explosive never went off.

        The cathedral is easily recognizable in that there are bands of black and white marble on its face. The design detail is carried out in the Pisan style. The present structure dates from the 1200s. The dome of the church is the work of Alessi; the bell tower also known as the Campanile dates from the 1500s.




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