Star Trek: Voyager - Drive  » TV  »
1.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • Voyager , is Star Trek's one and only space race themed episode to date, and unfortunately, it is neither exciting or intense - two qualities that I associate with racing
  • When he informs her of the race, she says that she understands - and so then begins a very predictable story where B'Elanna is smiling on the outside and frowning on the inside, which ultimately culminates in her true feelings of discontent flowing out and finally the two resolving the problem
  • Such a progression of events is something that has been used time and again in entertainment, and it is not at all fresh, but quite boring

    • by GenesisOne
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      “Drive”, the season seven episode of “Star Trek: Voyager”, is Star Trek’s one and only “space race” themed episode to date, and unfortunately, it is neither exciting or intense - two qualities that I associate with racing. Granted, it is difficult to do a race in space that is fun to watch because space is infinitely open aside from objects such as planets, starts, asteroids and so on, but still, it would have been great to see the shuttles race around and past asteroids as opposed to just race in a straight line. Also, although the race involves around ten vessels, only three are ever really focused on aside from some brief shots at the start of the race and at the end.

      The CGI is impressive, I admit,


      especially the exterior shot that focuses on the crew of Voyager watching as the shadows of the shuttles flyby as well as the shots of all the ships lined up on the left and right and the racers in the middle. The CGI is very nice in this episode, even if the race itself is not as impressive to watch.

      I also disliked the underlying stories that made up this episode. Tom gets all excited and enters a race, forgetting all about the upcoming weekend that he and B’Elanna had set up together - they rarely have time off at the same time, so this is something B’Elanna has really been looking forward to.

      When he informs her of the race, she says that she understands - and so ...


      • then begins a very predictable story where B’Elanna is smiling on the outside and frowning on the inside, which ultimately culminates in her true feelings of discontent flowing out and finally the two resolving the problem. Such a progression of events is something that has been used time and again in entertainment, and it is not at all fresh, but quite boring.

        Then there is the equally predictable and drab storyline that focuses on this one racer that has planted a bomb at the finish line in an effort to tear apart the fragile peace treaty that now exists between a dozen or so species. These various species have been at war for years, and this race is the first time since the signing of the peace treaty that

        they have come together to participate in a harmless and friendly competitive sport.

        The reason that this racer wants to end the peace? She dislikes peace and dislikes the idea of intermingling with other species. Not a very deep or complex reason for hoping to murder hundreds and plunge several races back into war.

        The episode as a whole consists of weak stories that failed to draw me in because its all so superficial and predictable. The concept of a space race is exciting, but this episode totally squanders it all way with storylines that are downright bad.

        The only redeeming qualities are the CGI scenes, Neelix excitedly taking over as announcer of the race and Janeway’s lines about wanting to win, and her reaction to when her crew loses the race. Bad episode.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in January, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 10101935161031/k2311a011/1.1.10
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy