Shooting Dogs movie  » Movies  »
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  • It is a British film about a BBC reporter's experience of being trapped in the African country, Rwanda, during the nineteen ninety four genocide of the Tutsis by the Hutu tribe
  • Even though they did not show the mother and the child being murdered by machete, I could hear the mother's screams and the newborn's cries as the murderer did away with her
  • I think that scene alone was enough to make me ask myself what I could do for places such as Darfur which are in similar situations now
  • I recommend this film to those who are looking for a good film to watch, as well as people such as teachers, students and the average person on a whole who are looking for a film to educate people on the genocide that happened in Rwanda in the 90s


    • by RedTape
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      A couple days ago, I watched the docudrama “Shooting Dogs” on the cable television channel, Showtime. It is a British film about a BBC reporter’s experience of being trapped in the African country, Rwanda, during the nineteen ninety four genocide of the Tutsis by the Hutu tribe.

      Many people, including me, compared the movie “Shooting Dogs” to another movie with a similar plot called “Hotel Rwanda”, and I personally think I preferred the movie “Shooting Dogs” more than “Hotel Rwanda” despite


      the fact that each movie was about the genocide in Rwanda from two different perspectives.

      The first reason why I liked “Shooting Dogs” was because it was much more graphic than Hotel Rwanda, and when I mean graphic, I am not necessarily referring to the level of gore in the movie. By graphic, I meant that they showed the murders and rapes of men, and women, and children by gun and machete. It was this graphic violence which had managed to ...


      • evoke something a little more than pity inside me, to the point where I nearly cried.

        There was one graphic scene for example, where a mother and her child were hiding from the Hutu rebels, when the child started crying and then found them. Even though they did not show the mother and the child being murdered by machete, I could hear the mother’s screams and the newborn’s cries as the murderer did away with her. The child’s cries were then

        cut off abruptly after one last blow. I think that scene alone was enough to make me ask myself what I could do for places such as Darfur which are in similar situations now.

        I recommend this film to those who are looking for a good film to watch, as well as people such as teachers, students and the average person on a whole who are looking for a film to educate people on the genocide that happened in Rwanda in the 90s.




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