Star Trek: Voyager - Mortal Coil  » TV  »
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  • Now though, he believes his brief experience with death is indicative of what is ultimately waiting for him, and this depresses Neelix terribly
  • I feel the cast delivered stellar performances and the script is one that people of faith, I think, can relate to as it pertains to a crisis of faith and how that crisis can potentially tear a person apart where almost nothing matters to him or her any longer

    • by GenesisOne
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      Star Trek: Voyager - “Mortal Coil” is one of my favorite episodes of the series. In this episode, Neelix faces a crisis of faith after he dies and is brought back to life using Seven’s Borg nanoprobes. Neelix however is terribly disturbed because while he was dead, he saw nothing at all.

      He was raised with the belief that in the afterlife, a person reunites with family members in a forest underneath a beautiful tree. One of the main things that has kept Neelix going in his life is his belief that once his life


      was over, he would be reunited with his sister.

      Now though, he believes his brief experience with death is indicative of what is ultimately waiting for him, and this depresses Neelix terribly. It is very painful to watch a typically jovial character who is always so upbeat and happy be gripped with such intense emotional pain.

      He lashes out at others, in particular, Seven, who saved his life, because now he feels as if there is a great emptiness within him. His friends try to help him, in particular, Chakotay, who attempts to put some ...


      • of his worries at ease with an inspirational vision quest.

        The vision quest only makes his life worse though and ultimately, Neelix attempts suicide. This episode is really quite powerful emotionally and certainly effective in its exploration of death and one’s belief in the afterlife and just how meaningful and important that belief is in the life of some.

        The episode works real well as a character story too as it shows the viewers a side of Neelix that has not been touched upon before and considering how Neelix is such a kind, lovable character,

        seeing him in pain really hurts. The story connects with me and does not let me go.

        Even after it ends, I am left to think about what it had to say. I feel the cast delivered stellar performances and the script is one that people of faith, I think, can relate to as it pertains to a crisis of faith and how that crisis can potentially tear a person apart where almost nothing matters to him or her any longer.

        For me, this is one of the most emotionally powerful episodes of any Star Trek series.




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