EMG-60 Guitar Pickup  » Music  »
4.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • I know that James Hetfield, the rhythm guitarist of Metallica, had a lot of his guitars set up with an EMG 81/60 setup and the guitar I bought about two years ago actually had this same set up and after playing on it, it’s clear to me why he uses this combination as well
  • The Good – The best thing about this pickup is that the clean tone and just solo tone in general is great
  • I mean it isn’t amazing, but for an active pickup from a brand that’s known for “metal” pickups, the sound is really good and definitely satisfying for me
  • As I said in my review for the EMG 81, the 81 is a good pickup but it definitely needs a compliment to it if you’d like a versatile sound, and to me, the 60 is the perfect compliment because of how well it can handle what the 81 simply can’t
  • Although it may lack crunch, this isn’t a problem for me since I can just switch over to my bridge position and into my 81 pickup and get great crunch while the 60 can cover any warmth that I need


    • by Grimmy101
      TRUSTWORTHY

      followers:11
      follow
      Overview – As I have said in my past review of EMG pickups, it’s typically a brand that is associated with the metal genre due to past metal bands such as Metallica and Slayer using them, and then a lot of the modern bands using them as well. However, for this review I’m going to focus on the EMG-60 which is a pickup that I personally don’t think really has much of a metal tone, yet still has a very nice complimenting tone to some of their other pickups. I know that James Hetfield, the rhythm guitarist of Metallica, had a lot of his guitars set up with an EMG 81/60 setup and the guitar I bought about two years ago actually had this same set up and after playing on it, it’s clear to me why he uses this combination as well. Now I’ve said that this pickup isn’t exactly the “metal” pickup and I wouldn’t really classify it too closely to other EMGs and hopefully you’ll understand why shortly. As always, I’m reviewing from an ESP/LTD EC-1000 guitar and a Roland Cube 30X amplifier.

      The Good –


      The best thing about this pickup is that the clean tone and just solo tone in general is great. My guitar has an 81/60 combination and whenever I try to do solos with the 81, I can just never get a tone that’s really satisfying to me, the 81 really just lacks warmth. I’ve found this to be the case with a lot of the EMG pickups that I’ve played. Most ESPs come stocked with either an EMG 60, 81, or 85 and I’ve found that the 81 and 85 have serious problems when it comes to soloing and clean riffs. Now the 60 is a different case however. When I play with the EMG 60 in the neck position I can actually get quite a warm tone and also a good sound for clean riffs. I mean it isn’t amazing, but for an active pickup from a brand that’s known for “metal” pickups, the sound is really good and definitely satisfying for me. As I said in my review for the EMG 81, the 81 is a good pickup but it definitely needs a compliment to it if ...

      • you’d like a versatile sound, and to me, the 60 is the perfect compliment because of how well it can handle what the 81 simply can’t. Obviously the same thing goes about battery life for what I said about the EMG 81 as well, they actually last a pretty fair amount of time as long as you’re careful not to leave the input chord in your guitar so this is pretty convenient in my opinion.

        The Bad – However, although the 60 has a very nice clean sound and warmth, it definitely lacks in crunch and aggression, but I guess this is a given in. Obviously if something is very good at one extreme, most likely it isn’t going to be very good at the other, and this is the case here. Whenever I try to play an actual distorted riff with the 60, it comes out pretty weak in my opinion. Not terribly weak, but definitely not up to the standard of just crunch, tone, and definition that the EMG 81 and 85 set for the brand. This again is why I say that these pickups honestly need

        a compliment in order to get a nice and versatile tone. A 60/60 combination would have great warmth but absolutely no crunch while an 81/81 combination would have amazing aggression but terrible warmth. Although it may lack crunch, this isn’t a problem for me since I can just switch over to my bridge position and into my 81 pickup and get great crunch while the 60 can cover any warmth that I need.

        Conclusion – The bottom line is the same as what I said about the 81. The pickup is pretty good on its own and it’s great if you know you only want to play one genre of music, but if you honestly want a versatile sound – you need a combination of pickups which compliment each other nicely. As I said in this review, the 60 has a nice warmth to it but it really doesn’t have a lot of crunch to it, as other EMGs do, so obviously the combination for an ideal sound would be the 60 for clean parts and something like an 81 or 85 for all the heavier things. Alright on its own, better in combination.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 141211891510530/k2311a1112/11.12.09
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy