Star Trek: The Next Generation - Chain of Command, Part One  » TV  »
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  • Now the second part to this two part story, I enjoy immensely, but part one does not settle well with me
  • While en route, Riker and other members of the Enterprise crew experience trouble accommodating their new captain's orders
  • I know that real military officers do not complain about change when a new commanding officer comes on the scene and orders them
  • However, for the most part, the cave scenes seem to go on for awhile and are only mildly interesting, partly due to the horridly bland and monotone music

    • by GenesisOne
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      Star Trek: The Next Generation - Chain of Command, Part One is an episode that I do not care much for. Now the second part to this two part story, I enjoy immensely, but part one does not settle well with me. What bothers me throughout this episode is the fact that the Enterprise D crew, in particular, Riker, La Forge and Troi to a lesser extent, all react sort of childishly when command of the Enterprise is transferred to Captain Jellico while Captain Picard, Worf and Crusher are sent on a covert mission to a planet that is inside Cardassian space.

      Captain Jellico was selected by Starfleet Command because of his past participation in the signing of the armistice between the Federation and the Cardassian Union and


      with him in command of the Enterprise, is ordered to proceed to meet with a Cardassian vessel and discuss the troop build-ups along the border. While en route, Riker and other members of the Enterprise crew experience trouble accommodating their new captain’s orders.

      Jellico wants changes to make the Enterprise more combat ready in the even diplomatic relations deteriorate and the Enterprise finds itself in a war zone. With the way Riker and the others complain and fail to make the changes really brings this episode down.

      Jellico is not making unreasonable requests - Data is proof of this because he notes that the changes are reasonable and doable, with work and effort. This however seems to make the crew more interested in complaining than behaving like military ...


      • officers that put the mission first and discomfort second.

        I know that real military officers do not complain about change when a new commanding officer comes on the scene and orders them. These people are supposed to be trained, yet they behave almost like children.

        As for Captain Jellico, he is shown to be forceful, focused, yet thanks to scenes like the one in his Ready Room, compassionate and a family man. He is also very direct - such as when he tells Captain Picard that he is unlikely to return from this mission and that the Enterprise was his now and he was going to whip the officers in shape and get the ship ready for battle.

        As for the mission that Picard, Worf and Crusher are

        sent on, the scenes shot in the cave are sort of drab, although there are a few entertaining scenes, like when the three have to make their way down several hundred feet in the cavern and when they discover that they have been lured into a trap. However, for the most part, the cave scenes seem to go on for awhile and are only mildly interesting, partly due to the horridly bland and monotone music.

        The scenes on board the Enterprise are not any more interesting for the most part thanks to Riker and the crew complaining rather than focusing on their jobs. While it is necessary to watch part one in order to understand part two, part two is so much stronger and more entertaining than what is offered in this episode.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 10611887370830/k2311a116/11.6.09
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