Star Trek: The Next Generation - Imbalance  » Books  »
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  • It seemed to me that the author spent more time describing the surroundings of the characters and their inner thoughts than he did developing an interesting and memorable story that could truly be considered an adventure
  • While admittedly, the author does a decent job of expanding on what limited backstory was established in the first season episode, and the Jarada are one of Star Trek's most unique alien races, the Jarada are, unfortunately, also subject to sloppy and poor writing which makes them really no different from a lot of other humanoid races other than the fact that they are sentient bugs
  • The action in this story comes and goes, usually for dozens upon dozens upon dozens of pages at a time, and in between, a lot of the material feels as if it is filler material - like the excessive descriptions, which I do not have a problem with as long as the descriptions do not continue to pile up and thus fail to paint an image that is easily visible in my head, as is with the case with this novel

    • by GenesisOne
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      Star Trek: The Next Generation - Imbalance is a novel that I really had a lot of difficulty finishing. The reason this novel proved to be a forgettable and tiring read is because the story progressed at a snail’s pace and as the plot progressed ever so slowly, not a whole lot happened.

      It seemed to me that the author spent more time describing the surroundings of the characters and their inner thoughts than he did developing an interesting and memorable story that could truly be considered an adventure.

      This novel, in a way, is a follow-up to the first season episode, “The Big Goodbye”.


      In that episode, the Enterprise D was to make contact with a insect-like race and Captain Picard had to learn their language as a sign of respect.

      In this novel, the Enterprise D now is assigned the task of establishing diplomatic relations with the insect race, known as the Jarada.

      While admittedly, the author does a decent job of expanding on what limited backstory was established in the first season episode, and the Jarada are one of Star Trek’s most unique alien races, the Jarada are, unfortunately, also subject to sloppy and poor writing which makes them really no different from a lot of other humanoid races other than the fact that they are sentient bugs.

      They behave in a deceiving and treacherous manner, engage in such actions as kidnapping and assaulting a space vessel without provocation and resorting to tactics of coercion and subjugation, all of which are actions that are governed by motives of desperation and result in the story being yet another “if you had only asked for our help, we would have offered it” type story that has been done time and again.

      The Jarada are in need of a doctor, so, they welcome the Enterprise crew and invite them to beam down, only to then ...


      • Star Trek: The Next Generation - Imbalance
      capture Dr.

      Beverly Crusher and block the Enterprise from retrieving the away team while opening fire on the ship, thus risking all out war which apparently does not scare them a bit despite the size and strength of the Federation.

      The action in this story comes and goes, usually for dozens upon dozens upon dozens of pages at a time, and in between, a lot of the material feels as if it is filler material - like the excessive descriptions, which I do not have a problem with as long as the descriptions do not continue to pile up and thus fail to paint an

      image that is easily visible in my head, as is with the case with this novel.

      The story quickly becomes a rather predictable hostage story that just drones on and on without offering any real emotion or sense of urgency, and the ending thus feels empty and meaningless as there are no lasting implications on the crew or the Jarada and thus it is like the Jarada never had a sickness and Beverly was never held hostage and the Enterprise was never to the Jaraha homeworld.

      The novel is, for the most part, a waste of time and not worth a first, let alone a second, read.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 172910880740931/k2311a1029/10.29.09
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