Centennial: The Massacre  » TV  »
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  • That said, it's hard to watch a slaughter, especially one that is so morally wrong as what we see happen here

    • by Orrymain
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      Centennial: The Massacre is one of the most difficult episodes of this epic mini-series to watch. It’s top notch drama and stands up to the ongoing quality and expectations of this series, which is based on the novel by James Michener. That said, it’s hard to watch a slaughter, especially one that is so morally wrong as what we see happen here.

      The Massacre shows a very nasty side to the United States government and the settlers of the


      western land. The injustice here is so enormous. I really do liken it to the same injustice we saw depicted in the legendary Roots mini-series, where we saw how Africans were kidnapped and forced into slavery, treated worse than animals for longer than one can comprehend. It’s history, and it’s truth.

      What is represented in Centennial is also history and truth. It’s the white man’s misguided belief that they were somehow just in taking land from the ...


      • Native American Indian. In what warped logic did these early Americans think they had a right to do such a thing? It’s horrid and it’s hard to watch.

        In The Massacre, we meet Colonel Frank Skimmerhorn, one of the wickedest characters in mini-series history, except maybe for Chuck Connors in Roots. Richard Crenna plays the part superbly. You can tell because Skimmerhorn is a villain in military’s clothing who you hate from the start.

        The thrust of this

        episode is watching the disgusting attitudes and actions of the men under Skimmerhorn’s rule, the ones who killed innocent children and helped to wipe out a once strong Indian nation. It’s just not easy to watch, especially these days when you have to wonder what those Indians would have thought about white man’s abuse of their land.

        The other key event is how Hans Brumbaugh and Levi Zendt become friends. It’s a big part of the mini-series as it continues.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 102610876471031/k2311a1026/10.26.09
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