The Lost Symbol Audiobook by Randomhouse  » Books  »
4.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • In thinking it was a fresh change to use an audiobook for Dan Brown’s much awaited installation of the Robert Langdon novel series , I decided it might be an interesting experience instead of the usual things especially for a first person reader like me
  • A general disadvantage of hearing a book rather than reading is that many hifalutin words and details can sound vaguely, and you cannot fully grasp the meaning of specific words or that they sounded vague because they are spoken phonetically, unless if you’re well-versed
  • This is a wonderful novel and definitely one of Dan Brown’s best which makes a sophisticated bed time story for the casual reader


    • by jhunie

      TRUSTWORTHY

      followers:22
      follow
      This was my first time to use an audiobook. In thinking it was a fresh change to use an audiobook for Dan Brown’s much awaited installation of the Robert Langdon novel series , I decided it might be an interesting experience instead of the usual things especially for a first person reader like me.

      For the audiobook, it had a plausibly good crystal-clear quality. The voice talent was a guy named Paul Michael who made the narration from start to finish. I was a bit bothered once I downloaded the file because I had to shed a large amount of storage space on my music device to place


      the audiobook which was large, more than 1 Gigabyte in size. But the media file is in .mp3 format which should be playable in generally most devices. It was also a tedious hearing process to listen to all 138 mp3 file chapters.

      A general disadvantage of hearing a book rather than reading is that many hifalutin words and details can sound vaguely, and you cannot fully grasp the meaning of specific words or that they sounded vague because they are spoken phonetically, unless if you’re well-versed. Sometimes while listening, it can be a bit of a downer, it makes you want to sleep. But the audiobook ...


      • was done in a comprehensible pace and the narrative wasn’t too fast nor too slow. Of course unlike the book, it doesn’t contain any maps or typographic info about the locations of the story.

        For the book, it has the same style of course that’s made Dan Brown’s signature trademark of fusing both fact and fiction. Actually the book started in a familiar way, the entire book had similar plots to Angels and Demons, like the author’s repeating an old spiel. As all of his novels, this book focuses on one location (US) and its corporate establishments as Robert Langdon tries to decode the symbols and mysteries behind them.

        This book tackled mainly on the Freemasons brotherhood and the Ancient Mysteries. One of Robert Langdon’s friend was kidnapped and he had to uncover some symbols and clues in order to find him. The story also dealt with the internal affairs at CIA, which was interesting.

        The book remarkably keeps the reader hanging in suspense. As for the audiobook, it was efficient and well narrated. A good alternative to a tangible novel. This is a wonderful novel and definitely one of Dan Brown’s best which makes a sophisticated bed time story for the casual reader.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 171410868471031/k2311a1014/10.14.09
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy