Goddesses: Knowledge Cards  » Games  »
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  • They were incredibly inexpensive, at about $15, and comes with 48 cards in the deck, all as equally beautiful as the one I found online, and a nice book detailing the mythological story of the goddesses represented on the cards
  • I'm hesitant sometimes to even consider this a tarot deck, because it's so a-typical of the use of tarot
  • When we read the prose on the back of the card and the accompanying book, we are absolutely astonished how perfectly it fit with the problem she was facing
  • It's beautiful artwork with moving prose and I think you'll enjoy having it


    • by Anasuya
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      Though I’ve been a collector of tarot decks for many many years, I actually stumbled upon this deck purely by accident. I was surfing the internet looking for art of an abstract and mystical or fantasy nature and someone, on their personal webpage, had a painting of Isis and Osiris, and it was absolutely stunning, with ruch colors and smooth transitions between lines, and just utterly romantic on so many levels. It took some doing, but I finally figured out how created this drawing and it’s an artist by the name of Susan Seddon Boulet. Upon further investigation, I discovered that this piece of artwork is part of a series of art used in a deck of cards called Goddesses: Knowledge Cards, and I knew I had to have it. They were incredibly inexpensive, at about $15, and comes with 48 cards in the deck, all as equally beautiful as the one I found online, and a nice book detailing the mythological story

      of the goddesses represented on the cards.

      The pictures, unlike most tarot decks, take up the entire expanse of one side of the cards. There are no numbers of names attached along with the picture unless you turn the card over. Usually, in standard decks, the backs have a basic design that are represented on every single card, but here, the cards have their Goddesses listed along with the symbolism and stories associated with them. These were written by Michael Babcock, and they are sometimes just as beautiful as the artwork.

      I’m hesitant sometimes to even consider this a tarot deck, because it’s so a-typical of the use of tarot. I almost didn’t like them, strictly because they just couldn’t be used in the same format as tarot, and I was determined to simply frame the cards creatively and use them as art in my home. This was until a friend of mine asked me if she could draw a card for herself ...


      • and see how it related to things going on in her life at the time. When we read the prose on the back of the card and the accompanying book, we are absolutely astonished how perfectly it fit with the problem she was facing. Not only that, but this book is very encouraging and uplifting and there’s certainly a sense of “female power” at work in its creation, though not exactly feminist by nature. It teaches you, I found, how to reach inside yourself and pull out the attributes of this goddess from within, and use those attributes to overcome your trials and tribulations and bring new positive things into your life.

        I’ve since used these cards as a daily sort of meditation. They are marketed as a game, but I hardly see it as such. I pull a card every morning and spend some quality time trying to figure out how I can work its meaning into my day. I’ve also since

        bought a second deck and DID actually create some artwork out of it for a wide expanse of living room wall that was begging for something creative and original. So not only do I get to use the cards when the need arises, but I also get to see them on my wall and feel how they are working in my life. Friends and family who come over have made a habit of stopping at the artwork and looking at it for a while, and, becuase I leave the other deck spread on a small table beneath the wall hanging, they pick up a card that they are drawn to and read the back, and they always leave with a smile on their face. This, from even the most Catholic people in my family, who certainly don’t support the idea of polytheism.

        At any rate, this is not a game by any means. It’s beautiful artwork with moving prose and I think you’ll enjoy having it.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 281309833580730/k2311a0913/9.13.09
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