Rocky Mountains in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada  » Travel  »
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West of British Columbia and Alberta border, near the Valemount, Tete Jaune Cache and McBride communities
  • I highly recommend this place to people who may be suffering from heartache, depression or some debilitating disease
  • This mountain is considered to be the most treacherous in the bunch, so consider yourself warned
  • For one, I noticed the iron garbage receptacles found in most parks like Jasper and Banff, which bears or other wild animals will be powerless to open
  • I’m sure certified geologists are also always looking closely into erosion-prone areas, but I believe there is still more room for concern, or even more steps that need to be undertaken to secure the mountains for future generations

    • by RichieMogwai

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      There’s something for everyone at the Canadian Rocky Mountains, or the Canadian Rockies for short. For starters, you can pick your own favorite mountain. Mine is Castle Mountain in the Jasper National Park area. I find it so bewitching as it looks like a castle hanging in the air, seemingly carved by evil witches hiding in the clouds.

      It’s just a matter of personal preference, but I’m pretty sure you’ll find your own. One of the reasons I chose to live in Canada’s province of British Columbia is to be close to these majestic mountains, which according to geologists were formed from over thrusting. The process causes the surrounding land mass to go belly up.

      Make no mistake about it, these mountains are distinct from the American Rocky Mountains, which have not been subjected to as much glacier action. This explains


      why the crest of the Canadian peaks is sharp-edged, while the surrounding valleys are more rounded in formation.

      To enjoy the Canadian Rockies, my family and I first settled at the Mount Robson Park, where we rented a cottage for two days. It was so refreshing to be out there, the air was so fresh and invigorating. I highly recommend this place to people who may be suffering from heartache, depression or some debilitating disease.

      Both your soul and body can find refuge in these parts, and who knows, they might even make way for some healing to happen. Many cottages out here look like log cabins, and with the towering mountain, the dark green trees and the oversupply of oxygen, you can end up feeling like Superman replenishing his strength. I don’t know, but this was how it felt for ...


      • me when I was there.

        By the way, Mount Robson is the highest peak of the Canadian Rockies, towering at exactly 3,954 meters. For those of you who just can’t resist climbing challenging peaks, I strongly suggest you come prepared for this one. It may look kind enough, but it can be treacherous especially in winter.

        The second highest peak of the Canadian Rockies will take you to the other Canadian province, Alberta, where you will meet Mount Columbia. This mountain is considered to be the most treacherous in the bunch, so consider yourself warned.

        As you can see, the Canadian Rockies straddle between two Canadian provinces, British Columbia and Alberta. These two share the treasures, which can only come from nature, whether it is revenue from the national parks therein, or precious minerals. In fact, for the trained eye, it’s hard

        to discern that some parts of these mountains had actually been mined to death in the past.

        Luckily, the United Nations declared the Canadian Rockies a World Heritage site in 1984. So for now, the mountains are exempt from the exploitation of man, but not from tourists and height-challenged mountain climbers. There are, however, controls in place to cause the least amount of trouble for nature.

        For one, I noticed the iron garbage receptacles found in most parks like Jasper and Banff, which bears or other wild animals will be powerless to open. I’m sure certified geologists are also always looking closely into erosion-prone areas, but I believe there is still more room for concern, or even more steps that need to be undertaken to secure the mountains for future generations.




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