Sky Train Mass Transportation System in Vancouver, Canada  » Travel  »
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  • The best test, however, would be when athletes and tourists finally converge in the city and its suburbs come February 2010
  • I know firsthand that the Sky Train cars are narrow, only the Canada Line ones are wider to accommodate people with lots of luggage who are bound for the Vancouver International Airport
  • Overall, I would recommend the Vancouver Sky Train system to everybody

    • by RichieMogwai

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      Which city can boast that it can take you from its downtown core or from any of the city centers of its major suburbs, and whisk you to the airport all aboard a light rail system? From my last reckoning, only Vancouver!

      This is a major kick in the butt for Toronto, Canada’s proudest and cockiest city (I used to live there by the way). With the recent opening in Vancouver of the Vancouver Convention Center and the Sky Train’s Canada Line, the city is well prepared to host the 2010 Winter Olympics in a world-class fashion.

      Of course, for a regular mass transportation loyalist like myself, taking the Sky Train or any vehicle which is part and parcel of what is known as the TransLink system is not cheap. For example, to go from the city of Surrey, which is out in the East, to Vancouver, which is in the West, I have to pay $5.00 Canadian. The fare ticket lasts for one hour and a half, so if you have a quick errand to run, you may be able to use the


      same ticket back. Just remember, the clock is ticking!

      Let me help you visualize this better. Vancouver’s Sky Train system is called such because it offers a view of the sky nearly all the time, except in certain places like the Columbia or the Granville station, where the platform tunnels underground.

      That’s why it’s never technically correct to call it a subway, unlike Toronto’s or for that matter, New York City’s. The Sky Train does give the lowly commuter a scenic view of the mountains, the various waterways and the foliage which are all natural for Vancouver, but not for cities like Toronto or Edmonton.

      In fact, Vancouver is so beautiful and scenic that it was not difficult to sell the city to the International Olympic Committee. The best test, however, would be when athletes and tourists finally converge in the city and its suburbs come February 2010. Transportation authorities and even the mayors chorus that there will be no chaos, but I highly doubt it.

      I know firsthand that the Sky Train cars are narrow, only the Canada Line ones are wider to ...


      • accommodate people with lots of luggage who are bound for the Vancouver International Airport. I also know that the train is already teeming with masses of people during rush hours, so how much more during the Olympics?

        They say there will be more trips—I certainly hope so. In fact, there should already be more trips now! Of course, despite its flaws, I won’t exchange the Sky Train with Toronto’s subway system. The cars of the Toronto system are wider and more spacious, but there’s a driver in every run. The Sky Train is unmanned, the cars are controlled from what could only be a vast, fully computerized control center somewhere which must be teeming with operators from what I can imagine. I hope I’m right!

        Hence, when there is any trouble at any point along the line, TransLink operators are quickly dispatched to the scene or alerted by means of radio communications. By now, having lived in Vancouver for more than two years, I am used to that very clear, albeit computer voice that announces every station during the trip.

        In Toronto, it’s the

        train driver that announces the stations, so what do you think happens when he or she has an unintelligible accent? Worse, what if the operator forgets to announce a station? Go figure!

        Indeed, the Vancouver mass transport system is expensive, but if you travel after 6:30 p.m. on weekdays, or during the weekend and holidays, it’s only $2.50 anywhere. Since I work from home, I only travel to far or multiple-zone places during these times to further save money.

        Overall, I would recommend the Vancouver Sky Train system to everybody. Since the Canada Line opened in August 2009, I have tested it quite a few times. I used to have my friends with cars take me to the airport, or I take a taxi from downtown which can be quite expensive.

        >From now on, I just have to take the Sky Train. It’s incredible, from the airport Sky Train station you just go down the elevator, cross the walkway and zoom, you’re inside the airport. What a difference!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 38809827940130/k2311a098/9.8.09
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