Vancouver Aquarium  » Travel  »
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845 Avison Way, Vancouver, province of British Columbia in Canada
  • It cost me $50 to get in, but it’s well worth it considering that this place is not only an aquarium, it is also a marine sanctuary for endangered species
  • Besides, I know that animals in captivity usually live double their usual lifespan because they don’t need to hunt for food

    • by RichieMogwai

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      It’s very easy to get to the Vancouver Aquarium. It is at 845 Avison Way, in the city of Vancouver, province of British Columbia in Canada. You’ll be glad you visited this aquarium, because it’s one of the biggest aquariums in North America.

      The Vancouver Aquarium is just beside Stanley Park, a world-famous nature conservation area. In fact, the payment booth of the aquarium is adjacent to the park’s main entrance. From there you have to walk a bit to get to the aquarium. You might even pass by the closed down zoo where brown bears were once kept in captivity long ago.

      The Vancouver Aquarium, established in 1956, is over 100,000 feet long, and contains two and a half million gallons of water. It has 70,000 marine animals. It cost me $50 to get in, but it’s well worth it considering that


      this place is not only an aquarium, it is also a marine sanctuary for endangered species.

      Many of the staff you find walking around the facility are actually marine biologists. The facility is open to the public daily from 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. There is so much to see and so much to learn in this place.

      There are all kinds of snakes and frogs. The labels stamped on the glass lookouts are very helpful. For instance, it tells you which species is going to be extinct soon and why. It even tells you what you can do about it!

      There are facilities in this aquarium, which are open air, while most are enclosed in glass. For example, the pool for the beluga whales are open and you can take one of the concrete seats to watch them perform with their trainers. I ...


      • was lucky I did not get doused with water when I saw those huge creatures dive in and out of the water. Some people in the audience weren’t as lucky!

        At first, I felt bad for these creatures for being captured and forced to work, but then I realized why they are here in the first place. Most of them have been rescued from their dangerous habitats. Besides, I know that animals in captivity usually live double their usual lifespan because they don’t need to hunt for food.

        The Pacific White-Sided dolphins, for one, were accidentally entangled in fishnets off the coast of Japan. I’m so glad they were rescued. Some of them even showed scars or broken fins from the agony they went through in their lives.

        They are the smartest creatures in this aquarium. They can do just about anything. They

        can’t talk, but they can actually understand some words from the trainer. They can even respond with their own brand of vocalizations. It was then I understood just why dolphins are considered the second most intelligent animals, second only to man! I wonder what dogs have to say about that?

        The Vancouver Aquarium is wonderful. But more than this, I totally support the philosophy behind keeping all these animals in captivity. My heart goes out to those world-famous otters, Nyac and Milo, who were rescued from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Rest in peace to Nyac who passed away, and for Milo, I hope he finds a new mate soon! After all, we all have to move on, no matter how tragic life can be sometimes.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 38709825010630/k2311a097/9.7.09
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