Pit game  » Games  »
4.5
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  • You definitely don't want to play this game while grandma or baby is sleeping in the next room, because you just can't be quiet
  • In fact, being quiet would, in my opinion, totally ruin the game and defeat the purpose
  • If you have three people, you end up trading the same cards to the same people, and you don't really seem to get anywhere very quickly, and it's easy to get frustrated, so I definitely recommend playing it with four or more people


    • by Nikki Hanna
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      As I’ve stated in previous reviews, my husband and I put a great deal of focus on our family and game night with our two teenage boys (14 and 12 years of age). They get easily bored, especially with the typical board games such as Sorry or Life. And we’re always looking for inventive ways to pull them from their computer games and other game systems which aren’t as interactive as we’d sometimes prefer. A few years ago, I was over at a friend’s house for New Year’s Eve party, and she pulled out the card game Pit. At first, it didn’t seem like a very attractive game, as I’m not typically a fan of card games, but after the first round, I was immediately hooked.

      Now this game is an extremely fast-paced card game designed for at least three players, but no more than eight. The more, the better, because the more players you have, the more hectic, the more yelling, and ultimately, the more fun you’re going to have. And I mean “yelling” in a good way. You definitely don’t want to play this


      game while grandma or baby is sleeping in the next room, because you just can’t be quiet. In fact, being quiet would, in my opinion, totally ruin the game and defeat the purpose.

      How you play is that you chose the number of commodities that you’ll “trade” depending on the number of players. If you have five players, then you will use five of the eight commodities. Everyone is dealt the same number of cards. You can look at your own hand but no one elses. You look at the different commodities you have in your hand (such as gold, silver, wheat, barley, etc), and you bunch together what you have the most of. For instance, you might have three barley, two gold and one wheat. So, when the pit is “open”, you’ll want to start trading for the rest of the barley cards, which some of the other players have. Once you have your cards in order and the pit is open, you take any of the cards out of your hand, hold them face down on the table and yell out “one”, “two”, “three”,


      • etc, depending on the number of cards you are trading. And it has to be two or three of the same commodity. You can’t trade a gold and a wheat together. You keep doing this until you have received all of your commodities, then you slam you hand down on the center of the table where there is usually a card with a “pit” symbol on it. Each commodity is worth a certain number of points, and at the start of the game, you can chose a point level you want to reach. Like, whoever reaches 500 points win. And if I win three hands with gold, which is worth 80 points, then I’m 320 points closer to winning the game.

        This game is extremely fun, especially with more people. If you have three people, you end up trading the same cards to the same people, and you don’t really seem to get anywhere very quickly, and it’s easy to get frustrated, so I definitely recommend playing it with four or more people. It was funny, because I told my mother-in-law about this game before our

        trip to Virginia Beach that she was taking us on, and so she went out to buy it. When we got to Virginia Beach, she played it with us and loved it. The next day, we went to the Edgar Cayce museum (he’s a famous psychic), and found out that he actually invented this game because he needed a game that moved quickly in which he couldn’t predict the outcome with his psychic abilities. We had such a blast learning this bit of history about a game we quickly came to love.

        Even today, some five years after discovering this game, my kids still enjoy playing it, though we mostly only pull it out when we have company over and more than the three or four of us (depending on wether or not my angsty teenage children want to play) can have at it. Our neighbors might not be too happy when we play because we live in a condo and I’m sure they can hear our hoots and hollars. But all I can say is that they are welcome to mosey on over and join in on the fun!



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