Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn for Wii  » Games  »
4.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • I love the tactics involved, I love the creative characters and the different abilities associated with each different class or character
  • All of them have pretty interesting problems to deal with, and some of them, while seeming to only be there for comic relief, actually have quite a bit of complexity to them
  • After that animation is done, the unit gets experience and then they can't take another move until the next turn
  • In a sort of rock, paper, scissors idea, some weapons have advantages against one type, while they have disadvantages against another type

    • by Goombasa
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      I love RPGS. I especially strategy RPGs. I love the tactics involved, I love the creative characters and the different abilities associated with each different class or character. I love building my own specific party to take down my opponents. Therefore, it’s pretty much a given that I am a big fan of the Fire Emblem series. Then again, it’s really hard not to be a fan after you’ve played it. The Fire Emblem games are the ones that started the genre, and with about ten games to its name, the franchise is still going strong, with nary a bad game in sight, which is a lot more than other franchises can boast… even Zelda and Mario can’t say they have a perfect track record! So, today we’re taking a look at their most recent console release, put out about a year ago, known as Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn.

      Story: 8/10

      First of all, as most other Fire Emblem fans will be aware, this game is actually a direct sequel to the Gamecube Fire Emblem game, Path of Radiance. I’ll do my best not to give away too much, but suffice it to say that knowing about the events in the first game can be very helpful when trying to get into rather complex story of this game.

      So, we start off in Daein, who was the enemy of the first game. After the loss of their king, it was occupied by its original sovereign state, Bengion, who’s extremely cruel to the populace. In this dark time for this small kingdom, a little band of rogues, known as the Dawn Brigade, led by Michiah and her best friend/obvious love interest Sothe, who people will recognize as one of only two thieves from Path of Radiance. They are attempting to drive back the occupation army and find the rightful heir to Daein’s throan so that they can at last be declared an independent nation again…

      Well, that’s plot of the first part anyway. The game’s story is


      divided into several different segments, switching your party around constantly, sometimes forcing you to fight the people you called allies before. But anyway, the story is great and it gets far more complex as the game goes on, escalating from a small rebellion into a continent encompassing war. The characters are what really steal the show though. Every single character in this game, even the most minor unit, has their own backstory and personality, which is another loved characteristic of the Fire Emblem series. All of them have pretty interesting problems to deal with, and some of them, while seeming to only be there for comic relief, actually have quite a bit of complexity to them.

      Gameplay: 9/10

      There’s a reason that this series is the founder of a genre. It’s that awesome, and this installment is no different. Let’s start with the basic battle system. You have a set amount of characters that you can bring into battle at any time, though you don’t have to bring in a full team if you don’t want to. The game is grid-based and turn based. It always starts on your turn and you can choose units you want to move, moving them as many spaces as they can, and then either wait, use an item, or attack an enemy.

      If you attack, it enters an animation that shows each character attacking one another. Depending on your speed, your range, and your special skills, you’ll either attack twice, or your opponent might not counter attack at all. After that animation is done, the unit gets experience and then they can’t take another move until the next turn.

      Once all your units move, then enemy takes their turn and it continues in this way until either you meet the victory condition for the map, such as killing all, or a certain number, of enemies, reaching a certain point on the map, or just surviving for a set number of turns.

      There are a lot of subtleties that can greatly effect ...


      • how a battle plays out. For example, there’s the weapon and magic triangle. In a sort of rock, paper, scissors idea, some weapons have advantages against one type, while they have disadvantages against another type. Swords beat axes, but lances beat swords. That sort of thing. Also, if you’re higher up in elevation than the enemy you’re trying to hit, you’re chances of hitting them double while their chance of hitting you, if they can even counter attack, is cut in half.

        But wow, I haven’t even started talking about the different classes in the game. Every character has a class and that class affects what weapons they can use, what they can do in battle, and their overall stat growth. For example, priests can’t attack enemies, and they’re very fragile, but they can heal other people on your team, making them pretty valuable. Archers can only attack from a space away, and have an advantage over most winged foes. You get where this is going, I hope.

        But that also brings us to one of the biggest, most annoying parts of every single Fire Emblem game ever made. When a character dies in the game, they never come back. That’s right, death in this game is completely permanent. Short of resetting your Wii after a character is killed, there’s no way to get back those who you’ve lost. What’s worse, in every chapter, you have a lord character, which changes every now and then. But if this lord character dies, you don’t lose them. Nope, instead, you fail the entire chapter and have to start over from the very beginning of the map. This is the one thing that keeps this game from a perfect then in this category. If it wasn’t so unforgiving, it would be perfect, but I suppose that makes up for the slightly slow gameplay.

        The game also has a nice difficulty setting too. There’s easy, normal, and after you beat normal, you can access hard mode, which was originally

        Maniac Mode in Japan. Easy is perfect for people who haven’t played this type of game before and by the time you get to hard mode, be prepared for a real challenge. I mean a REAL challenge, you will get your ass handed to you more times in this mode than you do in any megaman game.

        It’s a fun game, though the pacing is slightly off and your changing party can be a bid disorienting at times, but overall, it has a very, very nice balance and a wonderful play style.

        Graphics: 7/10

        While the models and sprites do look better than their Gamecube counterparts, They still aren’t that different from their earlier incarnations. You can barely make out their faces in combat anyway. At least it’s easy to tell the characters apart on the map screen, but still, it could have been done a lot better.

        As for environment, again, it’s not much different, though they do look very nice. There’s really not a whole lot to say. The game looks great, but it isn’t too much improved from the prequel.

        Sound and Music: 8/10

        There are some REALLY awesome tunes in this game. Most of the battle themes are spectacular and really get you pumped up. But the actual music during the stages seems far too calm for the life-or death situations that the armies tend to find themselves in. Still, they’re pretty good all on their own. The title sequence music is also really good and helps to outline the epic feeling of the game.

        There are a few snippits of voice acting in this game, but they’re pretty well done and there isn’t enough to really matter. It’s only during the cel-shaded cutscenes that happen near the beginning or end of each part of the game. They sound great, and look great to boot, by the way.

        Overall: 8/10

        Buy this game. It’s a must own for any fan of RPG’s in general. The Fire Emblem games astound time and time again, and this game is no different.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 28209820111130/k2311a092/9.2.09
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy