Rayman Raving Rabbids for Wii  » Games  »
3.5
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  • It's not cohesive and it doesn't really change the overall play experience, aside from the fact that you unlock the games to play in Score mode as you move through the story mode
  • Their constant screaming, staring blankly into space, and urge to hurt not only other people, but themselves as well, makes them far more interesting than any other character in this game, which is what keeps this category from completely going under
  • Most of them are pretty well animated, but some of them look extremely cartoony and strange, like a game where you're playing as a little bunny icon inside a Rabbid's mind, trying to avoid paper cut-out ghosts
  • The exaggeration of the Rabbid's features is actually one of the best parts of the graphics, as their heads and eyes grow to several times their normal size when they're surprised or hurt in any way
  • It's funny to see it so often, actually, and it never really gets boring

    • by Goombasa
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      Rayman has always been a pretty strange series. Getting his start out on the ill-fated Atari Jaguar, the original game, entitled Rayman, was ported to more popular and (let’s face it) better game consoles, like the Sega Saturn and the Playstation. The game, about a limbless character who saves his world from the evil Mr. Dark was so popular that it evolved into a franchise, with several sequels and remakes. It also had its fair share of spinoffs as well, and one of the more recent ones happens to be called Rayman Raving Rabbids, a release title for the Nintendo Wii. This game took the strangeness to a whole new level, mostly because the focus isn’t on Rayman so much as it is on its other titular characters, the Rabbids.

      Story: 5/10

      The story is paper-thin, and is barely even noticeable, so much so that it wouldn’t even affect the game had the story just been scrapped and this was made into a simple mini-game collection, which it is anyway. The plot, or some semblance thereof is that Rayman and all of the Globox children are captured by strange, crazy creatures known as Rabbids, giant rabbits that seem to get their kicks by watching other people do nonsensical activities for their amusement. Rayman acts as their newest gladiator, competing for them in these games.

      Like I said, it is paper thin and it doesn’t need to exist at all. It’s not cohesive and it doesn’t really change the overall play experience, aside from the fact that you unlock the games to play in Score mode as you move through the story mode. Rayman himself is a bland, unchanging character. In fact, if his name weren’t


      in the title, you’d think that the game didn’t have anything to do with him, which it barely does in the first place. It’s all about the Rabbids. These sadistic, numb, crazy bunnies steal the show with their strange, unorthodox behavior. Their constant screaming, staring blankly into space, and urge to hurt not only other people, but themselves as well, makes them far more interesting than any other character in this game, which is what keeps this category from completely going under.

      Gameplay: 8/10

      It’s actually hard to define this game because it’s just so strange. The game is basically a collection of mini-games, but all the games are centered around the Wii Remote’s motion sensor capabilities, and they’re all quite freaky. For example, one of the very first games you play is entitled “Bunnies don’t know what to do with Cows” and it involves Rayman spinning a big cow on the end of a chain and tossing it as far as he can, sort of like the Hammer Toss at the olympics. It’s a pretty simple challenge, but it’s just so out there, the fact that you’re throwing a cow!

      At each point in the game, you’re given four games to play, three of them are all different, but the fourth game is always a rhythm game, set to contemporary pop tunes. It’s kind of like dance dance revolution for your hands, in that you need to shake the Wii remote or the nunchuck attachment depending on wether bunnies are approaching you from the left or right side of the screen to knock them off and score points. After you clear three out of every four games, a giant door opens up and you play a boss stage, which will lead you to the next day of events if you beat it. A majority of these boss stages involve a first-person rail shooter where Rayman, armed with a plunger gun and his fists, must make it to the end of a stage and save a Globox kid by shooting a bunch of bunnies and their robotic henchmen. There are some variations on the shooting game, though. Sometimes, the boss stage involves racing a giant warthog against a race track while another might involve Rayman skydiving through smoke rings down into a canyon filled with bunnies dressed as Native Americans.

      All these games are weird, but they all make great use of the remote controller very well, what with the shooting games. Some games require you to aim with the remote and then swing or shake the nunchuck rapidly to do such things as wail on a Rabbid’s head for thirty seconds, or continually pump carrot juice into the Rabbid’s diving masks.

      It’s amazingly entertaining and you’re never really sure what’s going to happen when you win or lose until you actually try the games out. Some games can’t even be won. Instead it’s a test to see how long you can endure a particular challenge, such as swinging outhouse doors closed before the bunnies inside throw plungers right into your face. It’s hilarious, because none of it makes any logical sense. But in a world where a person can still support themselves without arms or legs, I suppose it doesn’t really matter.

      Anyway, as you unlock games in the story mode, they become available in the Score Mode, which is where you’ll spend a lot of your time.


      • Rayman Raving Rabbids for Wii
      You can replay all the games here, and by performing well in them, you get points, up to 1000 points per game. When you accumulate enough points, you can unlock bonus art and movies, as well as special challenges that involve completing several different games back to back, usually linked by a common theme, like several rhythm games or skill games. They are fun, but due to a major glitch in the game that makes it impossible to get all 1000 points in one of the rhythm games, no matter how well you do, you can’t unlock the last few challenges or bonuses. Aside from this major disappointment, the gameplay is fun, addicting, easy to pick up and play, and it has an amusing entertainment factor that will last it for a good long time.

      Graphics: 7/10

      This is another part of the game that’s kind of hard to score because the graphics vary from game to game. Most of them are pretty well animated, but some of them look extremely cartoony and strange, like a game where you’re playing as a little bunny icon inside a Rabbid’s mind, trying to avoid paper cut-out ghosts. It’s one of the weirdest looking parts in the game. But other than that, all the characters and environments have a lot of structure, and are still really fun to play, despite how weird they get. The exaggeration of the Rabbid’s features is actually one of the best parts of the graphics, as their heads and eyes grow to several times their normal size when they’re surprised or hurt in any way.

      Music and Sound: 8/10

      The game is full of weird and bizarre music and sounds. First, there’s the selection

      of pop songs, which usually only plays during the rhythm games, like Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and La Bamba. There doesn’t seem to be anything to link the songs other than the fact that they’re all different genres, but overall, there’s a pretty good selection of pop songs. Some games don’t even feature music at all, such as the game where you’re playing Bowling with several bunnies suspended over a cliff and you use a huge barrel as your bowling ball. As funny as it is, most of the sound you get is the barrel rolling down the track and the sound of the bunnies screaming as they’re knocked over by the huge barrel.

      The most prominent sound that you hear is the loud “DAAAAAAAAH!” that all the Rabbids exclaim in almost every situation. It’s funny to see it so often, actually, and it never really gets boring. other than those exclamations, there’s no voice acting other than some little gibberish uttered by Rayman and the ‘Help!’ you hear form the Globox children. Still, they’re great to hear, and they only add to the absurdity of the world we’ve been tossed into.

      Overall: 7/10

      The game is great, and it plays well, though early trailers led us to believe that we were looking at another full-fledged Rayman game, and not a spinoff collection of minigames. In spite of that, it works, and it works well. The developers took full advantage of the Wii’s motion controls and it was put to full use. Despite it being a very early title for the system, it’s still by far one of the best party games you can get, and the multiplayer features in it make it the best bang for your buck.




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Rayman Raving Rabbids for Wii
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Nuria Antich says :

Is this a good game for kids aged 6, which one of the Rayman Rabbits would be better

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John says :

Yes, it’s preferred for kids 3 years and over. There’s no violence, which is important. I would personally suggest Raving Rabbids 2. There are 60 mini-games included with this version. There are also improvements in terms of customizations.

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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 283008815551131/k2311a0830/8.30.09
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