Jeremiah: The Long Road  » TV  »
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  • Warner and Perry have an interesting chemistry that works as their characters get to know each other and bond
  • I love the song that is used for the theme of Jeremiah in the movie

    • by Orrymain
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      Jeremiah: The Long Road is the pilot movie for this science fiction series about life after the Big Death, an unknown disease that killed everyone over the age of puberty. Only the children survived, left to fend for themselves and create a new world, one that is chaotic and primitive in many ways.

      Luke Perry stars in the title role of Jeremiah, a rather serious young man who takes his promises seriously. He writes letters to his late father, mailing them via fire. He talks often about the end of his dad’s


      world being the beginning of his world. It’s really well done from this perspective. I love the letters.

      The series co-stars Cosby kid Malcolm-Jamal Warner and considering that I wasn’t a great fan of him on Cosby, I actually somewhat like his character of Kurdy in this show. Warner and Perry have an interesting chemistry that works as their characters get to know each other and bond.

      In this first movie which sets up the series, I took notice of a character named Elizabeth. I knew her voice instantly. The part ...


      • was played by Kandyse McClure, who guest starred in an episode of Stargate SG-1. She played Kegan. I liked her better here in Jeremiah.

        Another SG-1 alum, Alex Zahara, has an interesting role in this show , too. At the beginning, he appears out of nowhere and gives Jeremiah a warning that is also a blessing and then at the end he pops up and makes an ominous phone call. It’s not explained in the movie, but it sure is intriguing.

        I love the song that is used for the theme of

        Jeremiah in the movie. It talks in part about a world where we can be free, and I was drawn into that.

        On the down side, there was way too much profanity for my liking. Oftentimes, it felt out of place and just thrown in to try and give it an edgier tone. Profanity for the sake of profanity detracts more than it attracts.

        I was surprised by Jeremiah in that I became interested in it, which is something I didn’t think that I would. I’m curious to see what happened in the regular episodes.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 10908793130631/k2311a089/8.9.09
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