Pink Floyd - The Division Bell  » Music  »
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  • After the first few tracks I figured that this record would average and wouldn't have anything too special in it, besides some nice guitar work throughout, but as the record went on I honestly just became more impressed
  • I can’t really remember what the rest of The Division Bell sounds like, but if it’s an extremely mellow record, which I know most of it is, this is a very fitting opening song
  • Slightly boring to listen to, but it creates a wonderful mood for the rest of the tracks
  • After a while, Gilmour’s lead comes in and this is honestly the only part of the song I can say that I like, but sadly it isn’t enough to save the track
  • Gilmour once again has a very melodic vocal delivery, and the echo effect on his vocals really help him on this track in my opinion, it just creates a great sound


    • by Grimmy101
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      Overview - The Division Bell, Pink Floyd’s final album, shows that David Gilmour can continue to really produce solid music even without the help of his past partner, Roger Waters. After the first few tracks I figured that this record would average and wouldn’t have anything too special in it, besides some nice guitar work throughout, but as the record went on I honestly just became more impressed. Gilmour is extremely steady in delivering excellent guitar parts throughout this album and his vocal performances are also very good throughout as well. Although The Division Bell doesn’t touch some of Pink Floyd’s past material, this record is honestly a lot better than I remember it being and a lot better than what I expected.

      The Tracks -

      1. Cluster One (Instrumental) - Cluster One takes a while to build up before finally a very melodic piano line starts up and then becomes accompanied by Gilmour’s guitar. Musically, Cluster One is extremely simple and doesn’t feature anything about it that’s really attention-grabbing, but the mood that this song is able to set up is brilliant, especially with pretty basic instrumentation. I can’t really remember what the rest of The Division Bell sounds like, but if it’s an extremely mellow record, which I know most of it is, this is a very fitting opening song. Slightly boring to listen to, but it creates a wonderful mood for the rest of the tracks.

      2. What Do You Want From Me? - This track continues with the melodic feel that the opening instrumental gave, although to a much lesser extent. Gilmour has some excellent lead guitar work on this track and the female vocals backing Gilmour actually help the song quite a bit, surprisingly. Also, towards the end of the song I’m not sure whether it’s Gilmour singing with Wright or whether Gilmour is just harmonizing with himself, but that part sounds excellent. Musically this track is just excellent and if it were another instrumental it would have a similar type of melodic vibe and feel as Cluster One had, good song.

      3. Poles Apart - I can’t say that I’m a huge fan of Gilmour’s voice on this song, or really even this song


      in general, because I really don’t find anything too special about it. The lyrics are a bit more on the dark side, and the fact that the verses are written to Syd Barrett and Roger Waters, Gilmour’s ex-bandmates, only adds to this dark feeling. After the first two verses, the song goes into a bit of a longer instrumental passage which I don’t think is great, but at least it creates some type of atmosphere. After a while, Gilmour’s lead comes in and this is honestly the only part of the song I can say that I like, but sadly it isn’t enough to save the track. Brilliant solo, but the rest of the song just isn’t that good.

      4. Marooned (Instrumental) - After hearing Gilmour’s solo on Marooned, I really wanted to hear more of his lead work, you can’t imagine how glad I am that Marooned is placed after Poles Apart in the track listing. Marooned is a completely instrumental which creates yet another melodic mood, like Cluster One, yet this track is really driven by Gilmour’s guitar solo. To go along with Gilmour’s guitar there’s also a piano and drums on this track but honestly, this track is just dominated by Gilmour’s excellent guitar work. I honestly can’t listen to too many players solo for five minutes, especially if they’re just shredding, but Gilmour is a player I could listen to for a very long time because of his great sense of melody, great song.

      5. A Great Day For Freedom - A Great Day For Freedom sounds extremely dark at first due to Gilmour’s vocal delivery and the piano but does eventually start to sound a bit more cheerful, I’m guessing the piano switches from minor to major here to create the change of mood. Just like all the other songs, Gilmour has a great guitar solo on this track which really fits well with the orchestra behind him, creating a very full and epic sound. The thing about this song is that the solo is once again the only thing I really find great about the track, but once Gilmour starts soloing, he just keeps going and doesn’t let up. First half of ...


      • the song where all the vocals are is decent, the second half where it’s just him soloing is brilliant.

        6. Wearing The Inside Out - Wearing The Inside Out opens up with a saxophone solo, which is at least something different to add to the track and the album overall. Unlike the other songs on this track, Richard Wright sings lead rather than David Gilmour. I never used to like this song that much before, but after listening again, it’s a lot better than what I originally gave it credit for. Wright doesn’t sound amazing in tone, but then again neither does Gilmour, but his vocal melody is very effective for this track and works very well. The song is extremely mellow throughout but it does feature yet another great solo by David Gilmour towards the very end of the track which is just a nice way to end a great song, really good work here - a track I definitely overlooked.

        7. Take It Back - Take It Back is great musically during its introduction and builds up very nicely before Gilmour comes in with probably his most energetic vocal delivery of the album so far. Surprisingly, and unlike the other tracks of this album, this song really didn’t need a solo in it to save the track. The energy and flow of the song is excellent, something the other songs sort of lacked, and Gilmour is able to carry this track himself by just his vocals rather than needing to put a solo in it to keep my interest.

        8. Coming Back To Life - Despite what I said about the above track, it isn’t to say that I don’t enjoy Gilmour’s solos, that isn’t the case at all, they’re great to hear and I really enjoy his opening solo on this song. Unlike the rest of Gilmour’s solos on this album so far, which were all a bit more electrically driven, this solo takes a new approach as far as tone and just general feel, but it still sounds great. Gilmour once again has a very melodic vocal delivery, and the echo effect on his vocals really help him on this track in my opinion, it just

        creates a great sound. Excellent guitar solo, Gilmour’s been extremely stable and constant in his guitar delivery on this record which is great to hear, and the song honestly just gets better as it moves along.

        9. Keep Talking - Keep Talking builds up quite a bit different than any of the other tracks on this album and just has a different feel than any of the other songs on the album as well, yet I still enjoy it. Musically, the song is very good and actually features some pretty prominent synthesizers which help to give the song a different feel than any of the other songs to come before it. Gilmour’s leads are also a bit more unique on this track because of his tone on one of his solos and then the use of a talk box on the other. Very good song.

        10. Lost For Words - Lost For Words is probably the most traditional sounding song on the record, but this doesn’t make it bad by any means. The instrumentation is very basic especially compared to some other tracks, like the previous one, but Gilmour is still able to get a great sound out of everything and everything comes together very nicely. Gilmour’s guitar leads aren’t electrically driven at all on this track, completely acoustic, but it still sounds great and it shows a nice contrast with his other playing on the album. Overall, I’d have to say that despite these acoustic leads, this track is primarily carried by Gilmour’s vocals and he does a great job singing on this track.

        11. High Hopes - High Hopes feels a bit similar to A Great Day For Freedom just because Gilmour has an extremely dark vocal delivery with primarily just a piano underneath him, but that’s really just an observation, the tracks aren’t extremely similar by any means. Gilmour continues to have more acoustic leads rather than electrically driven leads which is similar to Lost For Words and it works quite well on this track. The song gets progressively more intense as it moves along and is just another one of those songs which gets better and better as it goes on, very nice way to end this record.




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