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  • A really cool Gothic site for your viewing pleasure I believe is Maria Am Gestade translated means St. Mary on the Banks
  • If you would like to visit the church, which in my opinion presents Gothic (architecture) in a new light meaning not quite so foreboding the address is as follows
  • I traversed to the Postsparkasse, a fine example of interesting modern-style architecture
  • When I think of classic Vienna I envision horse drawn carriages with drivers formally attired in high-topped hats traversing in front of Baroque architecture

    • by dawnmichel
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      There is a wonderful medieval core within the city of Vienna where time seems to have stood still. The place to begin this exploration in my estimation is the Stephansplatz.

      The enormous cathedral referred to, as the Stephansdom is the beginning point and is a gauge as far as treks to and from the city of Vienna in the way of miles.

      The first site I visited in a very medieval part of Vienna was Griechenbeisl also known as the Greek’s Tavern. You may locate it by traversing to Fleischmarkt (Meat Market) Street where it intersects the cobblestone street of Griechengasse.

      The street will keep you enveloped in a medieval vibe: there is a very cool watchtower and a number of residences with statues of the Virgin Mary.

      The Tavern is covered with glorious green ivy only adding to the charm of it sitting at the intersection of a cobbled street that climbs magically uphill toward the horizon.

      The carving found on the front of the five hundred year old tavern is in dedication to Max Augustin. He is known in connection with the Song “Ach due liebr Augustin.”

      The story of Max is as follows: Max was a musician who sang at Griechenbeisl during a health epidemic around the early seventeenth century.

      He was a highly popular Viennese personality and itinerant musician however he met with the misfortune of falling into a pit with the victims of the plague.

      It was thus rumored the likable Max was able to survive the ordeal due to the fact his person was filled with libation from (generously) imbibing at the Griechenbeisl.

      Another fact, of which the centuries’ old tavern


      is proud is in its introduction of a very significant Pilsner beer during the 1800s. This again, drew the attention of well-known figures inside and outside of the country such as Schubert, Wagner, and Johann Strauss.

      Grecian and Levantine merchants established the tavern five hundred years ago.

      There is a ceiling with the signatures of the rich and famous dating back two hundred years.

      The beautiful Greek Orthodox Church that sits next to it was the design creation of Theophil Hansen, the most significant neo-Classical designer within the city. The precise address is Fleischmarkt II, 1st District 01/533-1941, In order to reach it by metro take the following lines: U1 or U4 Schwedenplatz.

      A really cool Gothic site for your viewing pleasure I believe is Maria Am Gestade translated means St. Mary on the Banks. This is a magnificent tower with seven different sides with a cupola gracing the top.

      It was originally constructed within the 1400s and rehabbed once during the 1600s and again within the 1800.

      The church’s design employs a portion of a Roman wall at its base.

      The ecclesiastical structure is especially admired because of its unique architectural elements: this includes the Saint adorned gable that prevails on the front face of the structure; and a canopy composed of stone that covers the front entrance. Another significant detail is the lantern that sits noticeably on top of the bell tower located on the church’s south side.

      If you would like to visit the church, which in my opinion presents Gothic (architecture) in a new light meaning not quite so foreboding the address is as follows: Passauer ...


      • Platz/Salvatorgasse, 1st District. Take the Metro line U1 or U3/Stephansplatz.

        I traversed to the Postsparkasse, a fine example of interesting modern-style architecture. Translated Postsparkasse means Post Office Savings Bank.

        I was thrilled to be laying eyes on this example of architectural wonderment especially since the designer had been Otto Wagner—who a great many individuals have named the “father of twentieth century architecture.”

        The history of Wagner is as follows: In his paper entitled “Modern Architecture” Wagner clearly was against the revivalist architecture of the 1800s and insisted the modern-style (of architecture) was the way to go.

        The building was constructed in 1904 and the walls on the exterior are level and essentially unadorned in keeping with the modern-style.

        It wasn’t until later within the 20th century that architects started taking (Otto) Wagner’s modern-style design ides on a much more serious level. However, rather than use marble as was used in the construction of Postsparkasse (Post Office Savings Bank) the proponents of Modern-style architecture used materials such as concrete and glass.

        In order to add visual interest, since adornment was not part of modern design detail, different patterns were used with regard to the bolts that held the building’s marble in place. During the first part of the 20th century it can be said the Postsparkasse was quite innovative and futuristic as far as design.

        However, during the 1900s modern style architecture tended to evolve in a different way and the Post Office Savings Bank appears enormously dated to today’s standards.

        You will also want to visit inside of the Postsparkasse to view the restored central cashiers area. Once you are able to view the

        interior of the building you will see how Wagner’s modern-style carried over to the design of its Interior.

        The official mail address of this wonderful example of early modern-style architecture is Georg-Coch-Platz 2, 1st District. The lobby is open from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Take the Vienna subway line U1or U4/Schwedenplatz the tram 1 or 2/Julius-Reaab Plat.

        I do not believe you will want to miss the Museum Angewandte Kunst (MAK) while visiting Vienna. Translated the acronym of MAK stands for Museum of Applied Arts.

        I particularly enjoy this museum as it offers much in the way of porcelain and furniture manufactured in Austria.

        There is a presentation centered on Josef Hoffman.

        The museum continually presents mobile contemporary works of art.

        It also has a very nice museum shop, well worth the visit selling accessories designed by Austrian artists as well as furniture.

        The official address is Stubenring 5, 1st District. Admission is $7.90 U.S. and it is free to visit on Saturday. Hours of operation are Tuesday 10:00 a.m. to midnight and Wednesday through Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

        There is an enduring stately feel to the city. When I think of classic Vienna I envision horse drawn carriages with drivers formally attired in high-topped hats traversing in front of Baroque architecture. There are violinists playing Straus and Mozart in red velvet jackets with gold trim and satin pantaloons—it is all part of the charm.

        Ladies and gentlemen waltz and life after all is “the Sound of Music” if not to the Viennese certainly to the rest of the world who make its way to the city for a visit.




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