Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days Nintendo DS game
4.5
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  • The story is very interesting, especially since it is told from this viewpoint
  • They all have different strengths and weaknesses, but unfortunately you do not get to choose who comes with you
  • None are unique enough to be a complete revolution of the game, but because of the amount of them (Around 20), it keeps the experience fresh
  • The graphics and sound are also amazing, considering the platform it is on
  • There are a few elements that look rough, like the Weapons for a few of the characters, but otherwise this game has the best 3D graphics of any DS game to date

    • by Zack Boddie
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days is the long awaited, Nintendo DS game in the Kingdom Hearts series. It is the first Kingdom hearts game for the DS, and is a relatively unique installment in the series.

      358/2 Days takes place after Kingdom Hearts, but before Kingdom Hearts 2. It is the story of Roxas during his time as an Organization XIII member during Sora’s year long sleep. Unlike previous Kingdom hearts games, the story completely unfolds from the perspective of Organization XIII, with the Disney characters being much more minor this time around. It also introduces a new member of the Organization, who is a mysterious female who is explained throughout the story. The story is very interesting, especially since it is told from this viewpoint. It is much more serious than when it is when you are in control of the excessively cheery Sora and company.

      The gameplay is very similar to the other Kingdom hearts during regular gameplay, with actions being performed through a menu on screen in real-time. Instead of Donal, Goofy, and other Disney characters as your team mates, you will travel with up to 3 other Organization XIII members in your missions. They all have different strengths and weaknesses, but unfortunately you do not get to choose who comes with you. Don’t


      rely too much on your team mates, though, in terms of being intelligent. They are powerful, have an infinite supply of magic, and an infinite number of Potions, but their A.I. is not very strong. You really have to do the strategic thinking on your own.

      The real innovation that separates this installment from the rest, is the panel system. With this system, instead of the generic leveling and equipment of other RPG’s, everything is controlled through a series of panels on a grid. Every single aspect of character progression is controlled through slots of varying sizes that you put into the panels. Levels, items, magic (Which is no longer controlled by MP, but by the number of slots you use for magic), equipment, and abilities are all shaped into pre-determined shapes, which you use to try and get the most out of the slots you are allotted, kind of like the opposite of Tetris. Most are single square slots, but a few, like the equipment and magic, are shapes made of multiple squares, that you then put the single squares into for different effects. It is a very interesting and unique system, that allows for untold amounts of customization.

      Then is the other draw to this game compared to the other Kingdom Hearts, the Multiplayer mode. It ...


      • isn’t really as detailed or interesting as the Story Mode, but you only play this mode for the ability to use any of the characters. As mentioned earlier, each character is unique, with different stats, weapons, and special abilities. None are unique enough to be a complete revolution of the game, but because of the amount of them (Around 20), it keeps the experience fresh.

        The graphics and sound are also amazing, considering the platform it is on. While most 3D nintendo DS games are unattractive and messy looking, 358/2 Days has the graphics of a better Playstation 1 or Nintendo 64 game. There are a few elements that look rough, like the Weapons for a few of the characters, but otherwise this game has the best 3D graphics of any DS game to date. The sound is equally impressive. DS games aren’t known for sounding bad, but they don’t exactly sound awful. 358/2 Days blows most of them out of the water. The voice acting and sound effects are excellent, with the music basically equal to the other Kingdom Hearts games.

        There are, however, a few bad features of the game that don’t fit under a specific section. For on thing, the Difficulty of the Missions doesn’t have a definite curve, considering all the different

        playstyles. If you are a huge fan of Magic, there are a number of enemies that are strong against magic to the point of it being totally useless, but to be good at magic you have to sacrifice most of the melee damage, which leaves you stuck. Vice versa for Melee. Another thing, the health of enemies is extremely varied. You could be fighting a weak, few hit strong enemy, and then a titan comes out that takes shockingly long to kill in comparison. This is much worse when the enemy is also strong against your strength, where some non-boss fights can take minutes at a time. This may not seem long, but try holding a DS while hitting a button over and over again for minutes at a time, and see if you stay comfortable. Thankfully, these are not very common, so it is not game-breaking.

        Overall, this game is a great addition to the Kingdom Hearts series, and a testament to the quality of the games that can be made for the Nintendo DS. If you liked any of the other Kingdom Hearts games, or are a fan of Action RPG’s, you will love this, especially if you are starved for a good DS game, because you’d be hard pressed to find a higher quality one.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 28207747301031/k2311a072/7.2.09
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