Dark Hollow by Brian Keene
  • The main villain in this novel is a satyr (the half man, half goat creature from Greek mythology) and I don't think I have ever read a horror story about a satyr before
  • I like how frightening LeHorn's Hollow (the woods) is in this book
  • I love suspense in books, as that is what keeps me reading way into the night or wee hours of the morning
  • I think if a person were to see something unusual like a satyr they would not believe their eyes and try to think up a rational excuse for what they saw and that is exactly what Adam does at first
  • He struggled with the fact his wife couldn't get pregnant (and had a miscarriage), was eager to start his new book and enjoyed walks with his dog and drinking beer with the guys from his neighborhood

    • by Bookwyrm
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      This is the first horror novel that I read by author Brian Keene and I must say it is a real page-turner. This story has a lot going for it: spine-tingling suspense, a truly creepy setting, great characters and even originality. The main villain in this novel is a satyr (the half man, half goat creature from Greek mythology) and I don’t think I have ever read a horror story about a satyr before. I really like how the author took the pipe playing, forest frolicking creature from mythology and turned it dark and frightening. There is also magic in the plot, called “powwow”, and the characters use it to try to save themselves. The entire story is very well thought-out and has lots of great details. The human heart is right in the center of the story as well, as several men try to rescue their kidnapped wives from the satyr’s lusts. And as in any great novel, things rapidly spin out of control and the men grow more desperate as the book nears its end. There is some violence but it is second to the plot, so none of it is very graphic or gory. This book is very well worth the read.

      I like how frightening LeHorn’s Hollow (the woods) is in this book. The woods are really dark and sinister. While reading this I was always uncertain what the characters would run into while in LeHorn’s Hollow and that is


      for a good reason: the author has a ton of creativity and it shows in this book wonderfully. The paths through the woods change direction within seconds, the trees move and there is a strange carved stone tablet with odd writing on it. The woods also have a dark history of strange fires, people vanishing without a trace and evil deeds. Everything is described in vivid detail and I could almost hear the eerie piping while reading this.

      I like how the suspense builds slowly. I love suspense in books, as that is what keeps me reading way into the night or wee hours of the morning. And yes, I stayed up until one AM reading this one, as it was so intriguing. The main character is a mid-list mystery author by the name of Adam Senft and he slowly follows the clues to their frightening and bizarre end: first the mysterious piping, then odd footprints and missing neighbors. The plot just keeps building and building, the stakes growing until the explosive climax.

      The satyr himself is very frightening; too, a strong opponent and I like that. He has the incredible knack to put people under his spell and thus getting them to do what he wants them to do. He is very cold-blooded in a way, kidnapping other men’s wives and single women to reproduce with them. He sees nothing wrong with his actions at all and feels that he has the right ...


      • to do so. He is also physically powerful and incredibly fast. Nor is the satyr stupid; he knows exactly what he is doing. The woods are his and they will fight for him as well, increasing the danger. As a supernatural being, ordinary weapons have little affect on him.

        I also like how Adam reacts to the problems in this book. His character goes through a great arch. He starts out as an ordinary rational person: a man who walks his dog twice a day and spends his hours writing novels while waiting for his wife to come home from work. He doesn’t believe any of the wild stories about LeHorn’s Hollow or is superstitious. That changes and at first he has a hard time believing it. That is realistic and I like that. I think if a person were to see something unusual like a satyr they would not believe their eyes and try to think up a rational excuse for what they saw and that is exactly what Adam does at first. I also like how he struggles with what he saw once he realizes it was real: should he tell the police? They are looking for the missing women but they would never believe in a satyr. They would say he was crazy and Adam knows that. Deciding the proper thing to do in a case like that is not easy and yet Adam must decide.

        I also liked how real Adam

        seemed. He was like a real person in so many ways. He struggled with the fact his wife couldn’t get pregnant (and had a miscarriage), was eager to start his new book and enjoyed walks with his dog and drinking beer with the guys from his neighborhood. And once the weird stuff starts, writer’s block grips him and the words just dry up inside him. What he has seen plagues his mind and that’s why he can’t get any writing done.

        I really liked the back-story the author created for LeHorn’s Hollow. It’s very creative and yet seems reasonable in the coarse of this story. Any haunted place needs a back-story and the one involving the farmer is very good indeed. It was also ingenious for Adam to find the farmer’s old diary and that’s how we learn how the satyr came to LeHorn’s Hollow. It’s dark, dreadful and has a nasty end.

        I also like that this horror novel is not too violent or gory. It has some blood and people certainly do die in it, but it is not contain excessive carnage as some books do. Some books go way overboard in this area and the descriptions can really make you sick. I’m glad the author did not do this. This is a great horror story that is fun to read.

        I also liked the ending: dark with a surprising twist. I never expected that and I felt it fit the back-story very well.

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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 172906744050530/k2311a0629/6.29.09
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