Boston Legal Season 1 Episode 13  » TV  »
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  • I do not agree with the ruling with regard to Denny's case
  • It is correct, the you solely rely on fraud to experience the detriment you suffered
  • So with the defendants breaking up her, I don't think it can be attributed to her loss


    • by ibizaspain
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      Brad Chase and Lori Colson were defending Tracy Green, a client sued for faking her sexuality. The plaintiff was Stephanie Rogers, a lesbian and a public relation official in Boston. The latter maintained that the defendant and her were lovers. When the defendant gained access to her files, the defendant stole her clients and at the outset of their relationship, she pretended to be gay just to lure her into the relationship.

      Meanwhile, Denny Crane is defending a doctor who is


      criminally charged for prescribing a drug not approved by the FDA. Shirley was reluctant with the outcome of the case that she asked Alan Shore to second chair. Denny Crane avowed his being invincible in any case and was dismayed by his colleague’s reluctance.

      I do not agree with the ruling with regard to Denny’s case. The FDA is the government agency tasked to oversee the health and welfare of every individual. It was created to purposely to protect public ...


      • health and safeguard potential abuse for drug experiments. Every drug an individual will be taking is completely examined for possible side-effects. The agency has to be vigilant with this task. It cannot be left then to the whims of any individual the choice of what drug or what medication he is willing to take. The complexities of science is far fetched to the knowledge of an ordinary citizen. At times freedom is curtailed if it renders to be abusive.

        With regard to

        Brad Chase’s case, I agree that the elements for fraud was not met. It is correct, the you solely rely on fraud to experience the detriment you suffered. Was it the sole and proximate cause? In this case it was not. Even prior to the break-up, their professional reputation soared high and they got the popularity from then. So with the defendants breaking up her, I don’t think it can be attributed to her loss. The plaintiff’s cause of action is untenable.




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