The Law by Frederic Bastiat
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  • It was not boring at all, I was intrigued with this book mostly because of the prophesies Frederick made without even knowing it
  • What is interesting is in the 1970's what do we see
  • I definitely agree that this book is The Classic Blueprint For A Just Society

    • by graham_townson

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      If you are reading this review you are probably older than me. Because if this book was not a school assignment I would never have heard, or read about it. But, it was a school assignment. And, im very glad it was a school assignment because, unlike many books on government, this one did not make me fall asleep. I finished it in one day! Which is unheard of!

      Anyway to the actual book already! Frederick Bastiat is the author of this book and he lived in 1801-1850 (a very very VERY very long time ago!) Of course I am read the second edition copy write 1998. And since Frederick Bastiat was French,


      the book was originally written in France… meaning I could most definately not read the original! If any of yall can that is awesome! This book is only 76 pages long, which is nothing compared to Alexis De Tocqueville’s book “Democracy In America.”

      With a title like “The Law” I automatically knew it had to do something with… the Law! BORING! But no! It was not boring at all, I was intrigued with this book mostly because of the prophesies Frederick made without even knowing it. He first started talking about illegal and legal plunder. Illegal plunder meaning going to the gas station and stealing some gum. Legal plunder meaning the theory that

      the government can take from the people, and since it is the government doing it, it must be ok. What is interesting is in the 1970’s what do we see? We see communism doing exactly this: taking from everyone “legally.” In this book Frederick shows how a persons view of man greatly impacts the way he forms his theory of the way government should be. In example, if a man has a very low view of men and does not view them individually, but as a group, his governmental theory will always turn out to be something like communism. And history has shown us that, because of humanistic passions such as greed, communism ...

      • The Law by Frederic Bastiat
      (and every other governmental theory for that fact) will disintegrate into despotism/dictatorship. Frederick believes that it is not the laws duty to tell the people what to believe, think, or do. The law is to protect people, their property, and their liberties (this sounds like Rutherford/Locke to me.) Frederick Bastiat Believed that justice should be the foundation of law. He was not like Socrates/Plato in trying to find out what justice is. He seemed to believe that it is one of those things which we can sense, I agreed with him. Towards the end of this book he gives us a challenge to do away with all the false theories and ideas such
      as socialism/communism/Marxism and accept the truth. He believed that God made man in His own image, each individual is unique, people are intelligent beings. A main portion of this book goes over the faults of socialism, basically he leads it all back to the “legal” plunder of the people and how these governmental systems will never survive. I definitely agree that this book is “The Classic Blueprint For A Just Society.” And I encourage you to read it so that you can realize the socialistic elements which are being used in America more and more every day! It is really quite scary.



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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 171105695170131/k2311a0511/5.11.09
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