Marvel 1602 by Neil Gaiman  » Books  »
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  • I must admit I've never read his Sandman stories or anything else written by the man, but I know he is highly thought of so I thought this would be a good buy
  • It was not by any means groundbreaking or extravagantly brilliant, but it told a good, solid story (although it lost a little bit of it toward the end, in my opinion)
  • With some of the Dr. Strange sequences I think Gaiman is almost in trouble of losing track of the story, and would much prefer to just taking us on a ride through the many strange realms of Dr. Strange, rather than the world of Marvel 1602

    • by James Fleming
      all reviews
      Does the idea of Marvel heroes being displayed in a 17th century Elizabethan setting interest you? If your answer is yes, you will like Marvel 1602. If your answer is no, then this probably isn’t the book for you.

      It is rare that I pick up a comic book these days, but I did find myself somewhat intrigued by the idea of Marvel heroes running around Elizabethan England. The book is also written by Neil Gaiman, a heavy in the world of comic book writers. I must admit I’ve never read his Sandman stories or anything else written by the man, but I know he is highly thought of so I thought this would be a good buy. I certainly wasn’t disappointed.

      Marvel 1602 was a thoroughly enjoyable read. It was not by any means groundbreaking or extravagantly brilliant, but it told a good, solid story (although it lost a little bit of it toward the end, in my opinion).


      /> Let’s set the stage: the year is 1602 (of course). We are in England. Elizabeth I is Queen.

      Sir Nicholas Fury (aka Nick Fury) is master of her intelligence. Her royal physician is none other than Dr. Stephen Strage (aka Dr. Strange). Here Gaiman’s biases show, as these two characters, Nick Fury and Dr.

      Strange are the pivotal characters in the story. Certainly not major figures in the silver age comics that he is drawing as his inspiration, Gaiman makes these two the focal points of his Elizabethan world. Perhaps this is so because they are the characters that most easily translate to this new setting. The mystical Dr. Strange fits in perfectly in the superstitious world of 17th century England, and Nick Fury is a character that really would fit in any time period.

      Gaiman also seems most at home writing Dr. Strange. With some of the Dr. Strange sequences I think Gaiman is almost in ...


      • trouble of losing track of the story, and would much prefer to just taking us on a ride through the many strange realms of Dr. Strange, rather than the world of Marvel 1602.

        Other famous Marvel characters from the 60’s are present. The original X-Men (Now known as Witchbreed). Daredevil (my personal favorite character in the Marvel 1602 world). The Fantastic Four, Black Widow, the Brotherhood, Peter Parker (without his powers), Dr. Doom (Here Count Otto von Doom) all figure prominently in the story, and their conversions to the 17th century are all very well done.

        One glaring omission in my opinion is that of Iron Man. Where oh where is the famed inventor Tony Stark? He was very much a part of the Silver Age of comics, which Gaiman seems to be using here as his basis, and certainly would easily translate into Elizabethan England. But, alas, he is not to appear in this story. Perhaps the

        next time we visit the world of Marvel 1602. The story, as it goes, has some twists and turns, although for the most part it is a rather straight forward affair.

        Quite enjoyable, but nothing revolutionary. As for the art, it is done by Andy Kubert so of course it is excellent. I am always a fan of any art done by someone with the last name of Kubert, and Marvel 1602 is no exception. It is beautifully drawn, and serves the story well. It should be known that this is not a work for the uninitiated.

        If you do not have a working knowledge of the Marvel universe and her main characters, you will most likely find yourself very confused by this story. Gaiman is not writing for the laymen and for the most part expects you to be able to quickly figure out who is who. Not that you can’t enjoy the story without understanding who these characters are, but it loses quite a bit.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2006. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 17210665190130/k2311a0621/6.21.06
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