The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly  » Books  »
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  • I love my fairy tales, with prince charmings and princesses living happily ever after, but Connolly has put a dark side to most of our beloved fairy tale characters

    • by ponganne
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      The Book of Lost Things tells the story of a young boy, David, set in England during World War II. Central to the plot is his love for books, deeply ingrained by his mother who passed away following a long battle with cancer, presumably. He hears his beloved books whispering to him, telling him ancient tales and stories of old.

      From moving in to a new house and a new bedroom filled with old books, David suddenly finds himself in a strange land where his beloved


      fairly tales come to life, but with a sick and savage twist. I love my fairy tales, with prince charmings and princesses living happily ever after, but Connolly has put a dark side to most of our beloved fairy tale characters. I had a laugh with fat obnoxious Snow White, with the seven dwarfs trying to poison her and framing the evil stepmother to no avail. But Little Red Riding Hood “laying down” with the wolf and spawning a new breed of evil half-wolf, half-men creatures?

      • Too disturbing for a book which for all appearances was meant to be for children.

        Despite the violent death scenes for some of the fairy tale characters with a hint of sexual pervesion, the book does have a happy ending. Connolly paints a fantastic imaginary world and creates a haunting yet enduring tale. While this book is by no means meant to be read by children, I was deeply entertained but at the same time a little bit disturbed. The book has a depressing theme towards the

        end as David’s adult life unfolds. But then again, not every story has a completely happy ending.

        At its very core, The Book of Lost Things is about a boy coming to terms with grief and at the same time, finding the strength to overcome it and growing up to be a better man as a result. It’s a modern fairy tale for adults, with a hint of dark nostalgia. A good entertaining read, but I’ll never look at Little Red Riding Hood the same way again.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 172702610700628/k2311a0227/2.27.09
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