Melaka Malaysia  » Travel  »
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West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia about 147 kilometres from Kuala Lumpur between the states of Negeri Sembilan and Johor.
  • I went to Melaka with my husband and two young children and found it to be interesting and informative town
  • I grew up in the tropics and I found myself melting
  • You should arm yourself with insect repellent, and unfortunately the herbal kind doesn't always work with these insects
  • It wasn't as impressive as I thought a UNESCO site should be but it was nice to know a little more about Malaysia's unique history
  • If you're in the area, definitely give it a go

    • by drea
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      After Melaka’s admittance into Unesco World Heritage sites record, there has been a substantial increase in the number of western travelers to this Historic City.

      I went to Melaka with my husband and two young children and found it to be interesting and informative town. Being somewhat familiar with Southeast Asia i was surprised to learn some things, like Melaka is where modern day Malaysian began. It was founded by an exiled Sumatran prince who extended his empire to what is Malaysia today. I also found out that Malaysia has been colonized by three countries, the Portuguese, The English and the Dutch. Most of the architecture that remains is dutch. Not much of what the Portuguese built survived the arrival of the Dutch, the most famous remains being the ruins of St Paul’s church and the A’ Famosa.

      There were a few things that learned during my visit that might benefit anyone headed that way.

      - You only need 2 days, 3 days max to see all of what is in Melaka. One day will take you through the historical City, famed Jonker street, and sites such as the Maritime museum, St Pauls ruins, Riverside, mosques, older churches,


      Chinatown, the Stadthuys, Bukit China … etc… They are all within walking distance of each other. The second day will be enough for the outer areas with activities such as the local zoo and the Portuguese settlement.

      - There is no beach. Don’t be fooled by your map. Melaka is coastal therefore it would make sense that there is a beach. Not really. There is one area accessible to the public and it’s really nothing, honestly. It’s dirty and takes about 15 minutes to walk up and back down again.

      - It is HOT. I grew up in the tropics and I found myself melting. Dress for the heat, you’ll most likely be walking a lot if you’re trying to get to all the heritage sites. Hats and Light long sleeved cotton really helps keep sunburn out of your vacation.

      - The mosquitoes in this town are not normal. They are some kind of renegade guerilla mosquitoes. You should arm yourself with insect repellent, and unfortunately the herbal kind doesn’t always work with these insects. My 9 month old was perpetually sprayed with citronella and lemon grass insect repellent (that we bought in Malaysia) but he was ...


      • really chewed up by the mozzies!

        - If you are traveling on a budget. Consider the guesthouses. There are several guesthouses in Melaka offering family friendly facilites such as common areas, kitchenettes, free coffee/tea, warm waters, free wifi, hot showers, bike rentals, free and paid washing facilities…etc They are a pleasant option that will actually give you a good idea of what an authentic Malaysian home stay would be like. Sites to check are www.hostelbookers.com and www.hostelworld.com

        - If you do select a guesthouse, pay the extra for air conditioning. You won’t regret it!

        - You are bound to get ripped off by taxi drivers. Accept it and be practical. Find out how much the standard ‘tourist’ price is before hand and stick with that. You can find out by speaking to your hotel/guesthouse staff prior to and during your stay. By right, taxis should charge by the meter.

        - If you’re an antiques fanatic and want to buy the antiques beware of cheap but impressively put together Chinese Knock offs. In the famed Jonker St, known for it’s antique shops and weekly antique markets, you’ll find that less than 15% of what is being sold is actually antiques. The figure

        drops to about 5% if you attend the night market. The night market is filled with cheap novelties, seemingly suggesting that antiques are no longer hot items with Melaka visitors.

        - Traffic in Melaka is horrendous. In a lot of Asia, driving is almost personal challenge. You will find yourself crossing through cars and buses that have stopped due to traffic just to cross the road- because there are few traffic lights and cross walks in Melaka and plenty of instances where you will need to cross a road. And just when you think you’ve got the road to yourself, look out for the motorbikes that always seem to be right there when you need to cross. There are several pedestrian unfriendly places in the Bukit Cina, Chinatown area where sharp turns and blind bends could result in disaster for the unaware pedestrian. Be very careful with the traffic, especially if you are traveling with children.

        All in all, I’d give this site a 6. It wasn’t as impressive as I thought a UNESCO site should be but it was nice to know a little more about Malaysia’s unique history. If you’re in the area, definitely give it a go.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in February, 2009. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 381902600481228/k2311a0219/2.19.09
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