Streets of Fire
5.0
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  • I love to see the stars in minor roles before they hit it big
  • The inclusion of a black Do Wop style singing group was a nice touch and created an interesting musical contrast

    • by Manolo
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      Streets of Fire with Rick Moranis, Willem Dafoe, Diane Lane, Michael Pare, and Amy Madigan. This movie was subtitled, A Rock and Roll Fable. That and along with the acting of one of my favorites, Michael Pare, was the reason I watched this classic.

      I loved Pare as a rock and roll icon in Eddie and the Cruisers, and he delivered the same tough but likeable quality in this performance. In addition there were a lot of young actors and actresses who went on to stardom.

      I love to see the stars in minor roles before they hit it big.


      I especially enjoyed Morannis.

      He started off as a tough talking big shot but quickly reverted to his high squeaky voice of a wimp. Diane Lane is great looking now, but she was incredible as a young rock Madonna like performer in this movie.

      Add the original tunes that give this movie an unique quality and Streets of Fire becomes a must see film. The movie starts off with Lane singing a Meat Loaf like song in a concert in front of hundreds of screaming teenagers.

      Then a motor cycle gang called the Bombers appear from the shadows to kidnap ...


      • Lane. The use of Bela Lugosi type focus on the eyes to denote evil was very effective as Dafoe defined the evil target for our hero Pare.

        As Tom Cody, Pare enlists the aid of Morannis and Madigan, a butch type soldier, to rescue his old flame from the grasp of Dafoe. One line in particular makes the audience see the real Cody behind the tough facade as he states, People always hire bums like me for jobs like this.

        After the rescue, Dafoe promises to come for Lane and Cody. He replies, I’ll be waiting.

        At the end,

        the final fight scene is short lived but powerful. The music video type scenes are very effective in taking the audience back in time to the duck tail style of hair cuts that the gang members had.

        The inclusion of a black Do Wop style singing group was a nice touch and created an interesting musical contrast. The camera work was primarily colored clothes against black back drops and created the sinister effect.

        At the end, our hero shows us what real love is as he leaves town as not to stand in the way of Lane’s rise to stardom. I love a happy ending, don’t you?




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