Feminax Ultra Naprofen
5.0
1 votes
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  • Unfortunately, this is a family trait which has passed on to my three daughters, so it is extremely important we find an effective form of pain relief
  • The best painkillers for period cramps are prostaglandin inhibitors, or PGIs
  • It was the first choice for thousands of women like me, who preferred to avoid medications provided by their doctor
  • Outside of going back to mefenamic acid, which I found ineffectual, it was hot water bottle misery for me and the pill for my daughters
  • I have been unable to find any information on whether it is safe to combine Naproxen with codeine-based painkillers, but my experience has told me it's not necessary Feminax Ultra made short work of my tension headaches, too

    • by Suzanne C
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      Period pain has to be one of the worst pains there is. For me it is particularly distressing, as I suffer from endometriosis even worse, now I have hit the menopause. Unfortunately, this is a family trait which has passed on to my three daughters, so it is extremely important we find an effective form of pain relief. The best painkillers for period cramps are prostaglandin inhibitors, or PGIs. Unfortunately, the only ones available without prescription ibuprofen and aspirin - tend to be ineffective against severe pain. The next best remedy is to combine a non-PGI with an antispasmodic such as hyoscine.

      For many years, the old formulation Feminax provided this in one handy caplet. It was the first choice for thousands of women like me, who preferred to avoid medications provided by their doctor. But then safety issues were raised about the double sedative effect of combining codeine and hyoscine, and the product was reformulated to become a highly priced version of Co-codamol. This annoyed me, since I had always found a bit of drowsiness okay, a fair amount, despite the added caffeine a worthy alternative to hours of agonising


      misery. I tried my GP’s advice of taking Co-codamol with Bucospan IBS relief or Kwells travel sickness tablets to add the crucial hyoscine kick, but this seemed less effective.

      Presumably, the hyoscine formula Feminax used was slightly different. Outside of going back to mefenamic acid, which I found ineffectual, it was hot water bottle misery for me and the pill for my daughters. Thanks, Beyer. But then a few months ago I saw Feminax Ultra advertised on TV. Previously a prescription-only medicine, it had passed all safety checks and been released for general pharmacy use.

      The pill contained just one active ingredient, Naproxen, and at first I wasn’t too impressed I still reckoned the old Feminax hyoscine formula was the only one that would ever work. But then my 20 year old daughter came home with a pack, enthusing about how wonderful it was even better than the old formulation Feminax she used to take. Since she and I are clinically very similar, I decided to give it a try. Which I did, the moment I started my next four monthly but incredibly painful menopausal period. It is difficult ...


      • to put into words just how marvellous this product is.

        The usual side-effects associated with PGIs stomach irritation, nausea have been overcome by the use of a gastro-resistant coating which also ensures the full dose gets to where its needed, rather than being broken down in the stomach. (The downside of this is the size of the pill. It has to be swallowed whole, making it unsuitable for women who have to break their tablets - hopefully, this is something Beyer will address. ) There was no drowsiness or other side effects, just a complete cessation of the worst tummy cramps I had experienced for many a year. This is not just a replacement for the ‘old style’ Feminax.

        It is better, in every way. The advantages are many, not least the fact that one drug does the job of four. I now realise that many of the symptoms of my periods: nausea, giddiness, dry mouth and headaches were actually side effects of the medicine I was taking. Although the Beyer version of hyoscine helped with my cramps, they were always there in a muted form. Naproxen, however, blocks them completely.

        I have been unable to

        find any information on whether it is safe to combine Naproxen with codeine-based painkillers, but my experience has told me it’s not necessary Feminax Ultra made short work of my tension headaches, too!

        The disadvantages are few; mainly linked to medical side effects seen with most NSAIDs and normally only at doses much higher than that seen here. Just as in other NSAID products, it is wise to check with your GP before taking these if you have any health conditions or are on medication. It is not suitable for lactating women or children under the age of 12. All the relevant information regarding contraindications can be found here: http://www. rxlist.

        com/naprelan-drug. htm page 4 onwards. Although the price of £4. 79 for seven seems a little steep, you have to remember how effective these are. I used to take 2 of the old formulation tablets every 3 4 hours.

        The only alternative to these would be a monthly trip to my GP; whichever way you look at it, £4. 79 is still a whole lot cheaper than the UK prescription charge!

        It is hard to believe this is a non-prescription medicine. Ten out of ten for Beyer a five star product!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in November, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 262611524110630/k2311a1126/11.26.08
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