Hairspray,Broadway production Hairspray  » Entertainment  »
4.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • My biggest regret, though, as a fan of the movie Hairspray, was that one of the few songs in the actual movie never appeared in the play
  • I will take a sidebar here to note that I know some of the people who are part of the stodgy set

    • by Izzie Shakespeare
      all reviews
      The traveling Broadway production of “Hairspray” came to Oklahoma City in April. Wow! We loved it. To begin with, my daughter and I were fans of John Water’s movie, “Hairspray. ” Although John Waters can be a bit odd (really?), he actually got everything right with the movie “Hairspray,” starring Ricki Lake, Divine, Sonny Bono, Debbie Harry, and many others.

      (This is a review of the play, but the movie is tops, too). Waters’ movie covers turbulent times for some Baltimore teens. He is certainly able to capture the age-old clicks which form in high school.

      Tracy Turnblatt, the main character, is on the outside, but she dances to her


      own beat — literally. The plot centers around a dance show, styled like “American Bandstand. ” There is the beautiful girl with the pushy stage mom, the supportive but “also outsider” parents of Tracy, her skinny best friend Penny, and Penny’s discipline-obsessed mother.

      This is all tied together rather nicely with a classy take on integration during the 1960’s. (Yes, I did say classy, because even though the tale is humorous, John Waters is cleary a proponent of the then much-needed integration). Love is the strand that holds the delicate weave together.

      The stage play was a great reflection of all the plots and subplots. The songs added for the ...


      • play were the usual fare of comedy musicals — upbeat and funny. My biggest regret, though, as a fan of the movie “Hairspray,” was that one of the few songs in the actual movie never appeared in the play.

        This was the song, “Do the Roach,” which was sung by Ricki Lake as she displayed the new dance she invented. At the same time, she was wearing a light, pink satin gown, ill-fitting to show her ample figure, and the pattern on the pink gown was giant roaches. For a John Waters’ film, this was a de jour piece of costuming.

        Perhaps the producers of the play (John Waters is listed

        as a consultant) felt that the roach dress might be too off-putting to some of the stodgy set that attends musical comedies. (The price of these things certainly tends to keep out the commoners). I will take a sidebar here to note that I know some of the people who are part of the stodgy set.

        They were at the play and they liked it. I didn’t tell them about the pink satin Roach dress. The bottom line is that, roach dress or no roach dress, if you get the opportunity to see the musical comedy “Hairspray,” don’t pass up a great opportunity to laugh.

        If you don’t get the opportunity, you can always rent the movie!




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2006. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 59290451121130/k2311a0429/4.29.06
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy