Cobscook Bay State Park  » Travel  »
4.5
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Dennysville, Maine
  • Typically enjoyed by a private crowd, it is hard to get a good impression of which campground to try
  • It is a large park with relatively few camping spots, and some of them are very secluded with simply amazing views
  • Another thing to consider when camping near the shore is that sea creatures can make some freaky noises at night
  • There are insects, though the ocean breeze keeps away most of the annoying ones (unfortunately the massive june bugs will still insist on smacking into your head at startling moments)

    • by Wingwoman
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      all reviews
      Camping for the first time can be scary, especially if you aren’t sure about campgrounds or familiar with the area you’ll be in. Typically enjoyed by a private crowd, it is hard to get a good impression of which campground to try. Luckily, I was given an excellent recommendation by a few friends to try the Cobscook Bay State Park in Dennysville, downeast Maine.

      Like most campgrounds in Maine, it is extremely cheap to camp there ($12. 50/night), regardless of which spot you chose.

      It is a large park with relatively few camping spots, and some of them are very secluded with simply amazing views. We picked a spot


      on the tip of a peninsula, which had us walking about 700′ from the car with our gear to a clearing surrounded by pines trees and blueberry bushes.

      This was on a slight cliff overlooking a beach that stretched 1/4 mile to the water with islands in the distance. What a view!

      Now, the famous thing about this area of Maine is the tides, with high tide being 20-25′ higher than low tide, and this change happening every 6 hours.

      This results in a rapidly changing view depending on when you’re looking at it, as well as a changing smell, as the uncovered rockweed can stink up a ...


      • storm if it’s in the middle of a hot day. Another thing to consider when camping near the shore is that sea creatures can make some freaky noises at night.

        We found ourselves nervous after hearing possibly a seal or bird shouting “help” and snorting repeatedly, and then in the dark of night there was some giant creature sloshing through the mud (a moose?). The park itself is great, with very helpful park rangers ready to tell you exactly where to go from the front gate, and hot showers available within the park.

        There are water taps throughout the area (ours shot out white frothy water so we

        stuck with our jugs) as well as spider-free outhouses. There are small grills at each site that you can use to cook, as well as picnic benches at most of them.

        I mentioned the blueberry bushes earlier, and I wasn’t joking– after doing a little exploring in the area around our tent we found a wealth of berries. There are insects, though the ocean breeze keeps away most of the annoying ones (unfortunately the massive june bugs will still insist on smacking into your head at startling moments).

        As for trails, near the Park lies Moosehorn Wildlife Refuge, a massive reserve with trails leading from the road. Bring a map and enjoy exploring!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 382309477270430/k2311a0923/9.23.08
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