The Verve - Urban Hymns  » Music  »
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  • The second album from the British alternative rock band and it is an experience
  • But I think you will be surprised at just how good it is

    • by Mr. Poffo
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      The second album from the British alternative rock band and it is an experience. From the opening chords of Bittersweet Symphony the single that propelled the album into the limelight you know you are in for something good. But I think you will be surprised at just how good it is.

      When I first listened to this album (which I had stolen, or ‘borrowed’, from my brother) in 1997 I listened to Bittersweet Symphony and thought the album was essentially done. I


      mean, how could anything compete with that? Richard Ashcroft and the guys knew how. The second song is Sonnet, another wildly impactful song but, importantly, impactful in a different way. Still, by the song’s end I had doubts as to whether the album could maintain this level. But one after another, from The Drugs Don’t Work to Lucky Man, to the final song, Come On, somehow The Verve managed to put together 13 songs that never even threatened to dip below ‘very good’ and often ...

      • hit the highest heights imaginable.

        Several topics are touched upon and every emotion seems to be covered here. The Drugs Don’t Work can almost bring me to tears at will, Sonnet can simultaneously make you rue past decisions and yet be hopeful for the future.

        The musicianship is of the highest level and Ashcroft’s song-writing ability is so great that even his voice which is only above average takes on a greater sense of sophistication and importance than it really has.

        This is a

        classic album, packed with classic songs. I wasn’t even that much of a fan of alternative rock before this album, nevermind being a fan of The Verve. But my perception was questioned and changed upon the first listen.

        Urban Hymns is a phenomenal album. And yes, I eventually bought my own copy and must admit, in this day and age of digital music, I cherish my copy of Urban Hymns like my parents’ cherished their Beatles’ vinyl. That is how important this album is to me.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 142307410521131/k2311a0723/7.23.08
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