Swingtown  » TV  »
3.5
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • As someone who married in November of 1969, I remember the seventies very well and while I certainly was aware there were couples who had open marriages and were swingers it wasn't something I'd had any personal experience with or even knew about second hand
  • It's interesting to note that Sylvia worked her way through law school as a Playboy Bunny and lowly runner Melinda, as she's called by her Wall Street co-workers, had no problem playing the sexual games that seemed to have been accepted in that era by women who wanted to get ahead in a man's world
  • I think I'd watch if only for the music and the laughs I get from the clothing styles from that era

    • by Annie Hartman
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      I’d intentionally waited for a few weeks after this series debuted before reviewing it because I wanted to get a better sense of what the show is about. The first episode was pure sex, or pretty much so anyway, with the climax (pardon the pun!) being the swapping between new neighbors the Deckers and the Millers. I really wasn’t sure what to expect in subsequent episodes and to be honest I wasn’t quite sure if this show was for me. As someone who married in November of 1969, I remember the seventies very well and while I certainly was aware there were couples who had “open marriages” and were “swingers” it wasn’t something I’d had any personal experience with or even knew about second hand.

      However, if you take away the “swinging” aspect of “Swingtown”, this show really captured the look, sound and feel of the seventies, a decade that was truly a turning point for many of us. While the main female characters Susan Miller (Molly Parker), Trina Decker (Lana Parilla) and Janet Thompson (Mariam Shor) don’t work outside the home, early on we meet a female attorney, Sylvia, and a female


      Wall Street runner, Melinda, both of which were quite unique back in those days. It’s interesting to note that Sylvia worked her way through law school as a Playboy Bunny and “lowly runner” Melinda, as she’s called by her Wall Street co-workers, had no problem playing the sexual games that seemed to have been accepted in that era by women who wanted to get ahead in a “man’s world”.

      The series focuses on Susan and Bruce Miller who recently moved into a bigger and more expensive home in a fancy Chicago suburb, their old friends from their old neighborhood Janet and Roger Thompson and their new, very hip and very OPEN friends and neighbors Trina and Tom Decker who introduce them to their swinging lifestyle almost immediately after they met. Susan’s best friend of over a decade, the very prim and proper homemaker and Tupperware demonstrator Janet has a difficult time dealing with Susan’s move to the new neighborhood and especially with her new friendship with Trina. Susan herself is struggling with the changes that have come in her formerly safe and secure life with husband Bruce. She can’t seem to ...


      • decide from one moment to the next whether she likes the idea of having an open relationship with Bruce or if she wants to forget their one wild night and go back to being exclusive. Bruce confides in Roger about what happened with the Deckers and Roger has a very tough time dealing with that revelation, going so far as to cancel weekend plans they’d had with their old friends for nearly a year. As it turned out, the Millers ended up inviting the Deckers to join them at their lakeside cabin for the weekend after the Thompson’s had suddenly canceled and just when the two couples were about to repeat their earlier game of musical beds the Thompson’s show up, having had a change of heart.

        There have also been some interesting subplots involving the Millers’ children, daughter Laurie and son B.J. Teen Laurie has developed a strong attraction with her summer school philosophy teacher and B.J. has found an unlikely friend which shows signs of becoming a case of puppy love with new neighbor, Samantha, whose mother is an alcoholic and drug addict who does quite a bit of her own hopping

        from man to man.

        Meanwhile, Trina and Tom aren’t as immune to jealousy and insecurity as one would think at first glance. Trina is noticeably uncomfortable with airline pilot Tom’s change of flights to weekly runs to Tokyo, which means he is gone several days - and nights - at a time and Tom is clearly disturbed when the couple runs into Trina’s high school sweetheart at the airport and make plans to spend the time Tom will be away to ‘catch up”. I won’t give too much away but I will tell you Tom makes it clear to his wife’s former lover that with them it’s two for the price of one!

        All in all I’d say especially if you remember the seventies you should at least give this show a try. I think I’d watch if only for the music and the laughs I get from the clothing styles from that era. Ironically, the women’s styles haven’t changed all that much but I hadn’t seen so many leisure suits or paisley shirts in a long time! This show is a trip down memory lane and a history lesson at the same time.



    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    Sorry, there are no related reviews at moment
    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 101507404681031/k2311a0715/7.15.08
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy