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  • I think it is the duty of anyone living in the western world post-9/11 to read this book
  • It is especially interesting to see how women are treated in this society, and yet how society is trying to make changes and step towards the western world

    • by KatieLynn
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      I think it is the duty of anyone living in the western world post-9/11 to read this book. With all the intense discrimination going on towards any person who even LOOKS like they may be from the eastern part of the world (the countries where these terrorists came from), people need to read this book to understand how ridiculous their overt discrimination of everyone is. Terrorist groups are the MINORITY, not the majority, and Asne Seierstad does a great job at opening peoples’ eyes to another way of living as she follows an Afghani family through their daily lives. I picked up this boko for about $15usd at a Barnes & Noble.

      Seierstad is a


      Norwegian journalist who visited Afghanistan after the fall of the Taliban. She was fascinated by the way of life of the people living there, and after talking with him on a few occasions a bookseller, who in the book is called “Sultan Khan” agreed to let her stay with his family to observe them for however long she may.

      She follows this man and his family extended family included, for at least a year, making accounts of every individual, writing detailed descriptions of family relationships. She makes a good point at stressing that, though this family lives like a western destitute family would, the Khan’s are one of the wealthiest families in Kabul ...


      • this in and of itself is mind-blowing to any westerner reading the book. It is especially interesting to see how women are treated in this society, and yet how society is trying to make changes and step towards the western world. However, as with any society there are dinosaurs that just won’t die out in this case, resistants to change, supporters of the Taliban.

        This is a great book; its incredibly detailed, beautifully written and its quite an eye-opener. I think before any American or European dare judge anyone by where they appear to come from and immediately associating it with terrorism, they’d better read this book!

        Regarding the “scandal” surrounding this book: While her

        intentions were good, I researched a little after reading this book and learned that the person the main character was (in real life), tried suing Seierstad for defamation of character. Now, its perfectly understandable if you read that book, that some things may not be word-for-word correct translations, but for the most part what Seierstand writes seems perfectly reasonable and believeable. It IS a true account, I will say that. This woman went to Afghanistan and stayed with an Afghani family, living herself as an Afghan, and was a quiet observer; so she wrote what she saw, whether or not she interpreted things the way they were meant to be is a separate issue.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 172605361290131/k2311a0526/5.26.08
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