John Fahey  » People  »
5.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • His career ended in 2001 when he died, I believe, of a heart attack
  • The relevance this had to me was my own experience with Japan
  • This was roughly around the same time, and for all I know and recall it could have been that very evening

    • by Matthew S. Tanabe
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      John Fahey was one of the very best things to happen to American music. I’m convinced of this idea. He was a treasure in his early career with folk and blues; “American Primitive” as it was coined by god knows who. Fahey would tune his guitar to open chords, then fingerpick the underlying rhythmic notes while simultaneously playing the melody above it. Brilliant. His latter years he devoted to experimentalism…what could, I suppose, be called “avant-garde”, though Fahey had been experimenting with layering noise and sound with electric guitars since the mid-sixties. He was far ahead of his time, but no one else seemed to want to hear it back then. So onto the shelf it went, only to be picked up

      again thirty or forty years later, when he discovered its rise as a formidable presence in the music world. His career ended in 2001 when he died, I believe, of a heart attack.

      I was introduced to John Fahey once when I was about 15. One day I stepped into the Guitar Castle in Salem, OR and Tim Knight (the fellow who owns the shop and has for years) had John in a conversation next to some amplifiers. I had no idea who this man was with a prominent stance and a heavy gaze. I only knew what Tim had said - “This is John Fahey.” I said hello and he nodded back and then Tim started to explain that John had just ...


      • returned from Japan and was quite involved, somehow, over there. The relevance this had to me was my own experience with Japan. So, thanks T.K.

        I was also fortunate enough to catch John play at a coffeehouse called The Bistro on the Willamette University campus in Salem. This was roughly around the same time, and for all I know and recall it could have been that very evening. He played for a long time, something like an hour or so, by himself. He played an electric guitar. He played almost nothing at all…but that man knew how to fill space with sound. It was fairly radical. That was 1999. I’ll never forget it.

        I listen to more Fahey now than

        I ever have. My first recording I received from T.K. about seven years ago. It was a live performance recording of the John Fahey Trio featuring Fahey, Tim Knight, and Rob Scrivner, on KBOO radio in 1997. By ‘97 Fahey had driven his music into the netherworlds of experimentation, but about a year ago I started to delve into the earlier part of his musical repertoire. I know if he were still alive and caught me listening to the early Takoma (Fahey’s first record label creation) recordings he’d probably shake his head and tell me to get a life or something. Sorry, Mr. Fahey - I’ll be nothing but an avid listener from here to eternity.

        John Fahey, rest in peace.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2008. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 521504337351030/k2311a0415/4.15.08
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy