Pride and Prejudic by Jane Austen  » Books  »
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  • The only relevance of the militia in a Jane Austen novel is its ability to provide girls with handsome military officers to flirt with and if possible to marry Wikham and the other military officers in Meryton in Pride and Prejudice serve a subjects for flirtation for Lydia and Kitty the younger Benner girls, Similarly there is no discussion of spiritual or metaphysical issue and Mr

    • by Tasleem Ayaz
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      ‘Pride and Prejudice’ like other novels of Austen have narrow physical setting. The story revolves round Netherfield Park, Longbourn, Hunsford Parsonage, Meryton and Pemberley. In an era when the English Romantic writers like Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats and others were in love with external nature, Jane manages to restrict her characters indoors. A trip to the Lake District

      is cancelled in ‘Pride and Prejudice’ and the only description of nature in Pemberley is generalized.

      She adhered to the settings of ballrooms, drawing rooms, parks and gardens and allows nothing terrible to happen. The greatest villainy in her novels is elopement (as in the case of Lydia and Wikham) or social faux pus as Darcy’s snubbing of Elizabeth.

      In the ...


      • era of American War of Independence, French Revolution and Napoleonic wars, Austen’s theme was so limited that it revolved round the orbit of love and marriage. All her heroines had no other business than waiting for an eligible bachelor to get married to.

        The only relevance of the militia in a Jane Austen novel is its ability to provide girls

        with handsome military officers to flirt with and if possible to marry Wikham and the other military officers in Meryton in Pride and Prejudice serve a subjects for flirtation for Lydia and Kitty the younger Benner girls, Similarly there is no discussion of spiritual or metaphysical issue and Mr. Collins the vicar is only an absurd, comic figure satirized by Jane Austen.




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