Shirley Valentine (1989)  » Movies  »
4.0
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  • Gilbert also directed the quirky and interesting Educating Rita (1983) starring Michael Caine, not to mention several James Bond movies in the 1960s and 1970s
  • No, I thought you were still Church of England
  • I think sex is like supermarkets, you know, overrated

    • by tfedge
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      “Shirley Valentine” is a 1989 color movie in English. It was filmed in locations in England and Mykonos, Greece. It is the story of a Liverpudlian woman’s midlife crisis who decides to do something about her life despite the fact that “no one thought she had the courage. The nerve. Or the lingerie.”

      Shirley Valentine is a middle-aged housewife from Liverpool who is bored with her life, her husband and her adult children. When home alone she talks to the wall. When her friend Jane wins a two-week trip to Greece for two and invites Shirley to accompany her, Shirley jumps at the chance. In Greece she starts living her life over again, for herself, for the real Shirley and not Shirley the Mom or Shirley the wife.

      Shirley Valentine is played Pauline Collins,


      a favorite of mine who played the role of Sarah, one of the maids in “Upstairs Downstairs” and played in “Wodehouse Playhouse” with her husband John Alderton. Collins is very cute with dimples that just make you smile. She has appeared in numerous English comedy series

      Tim Conti plays Costas Caldes, Shirley’s love interest in Greece. Conti won the 1979 Tony for “Whose Life is it anyway?” He was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar for his role in “Reuben, Reuben” (1983).

      Lewis Gilbert directed “Shirley Valentine”. Gilbert began directing movies in the mid 1940s. He was nominated for a Best Picture Oscar for “Alfie” (1967). He directed “Sink the Bismark” (1960), “Cast a Dark Shadow” (1955) starring Dirk Bogarde, and “The Good Die Young” (1954) with Laurence Harvey, Gloria Grahame, and ...


      • Joan Collins. Gilbert also directed the quirky and interesting “Educating Rita” (1983) starring Michael Caine, not to mention several James Bond movies in the 1960s and 1970s.

        “Shirley Valentine” is full of great lines, mostly from Shirley.

        When describing her neighbor, “if you’ve got a headache, she’s got a brain tumor.”

        When talking to her neighbor, “Didn’t you know we had become vegans?” “No, I thought you were still Church of England.”

        “A vegetarian bloodhound?”

        “I’d like to drink of glass of wine in the country where the grape is grown.”

        “Why do we get all of this life if we don’t ever use it?”

        “I think sex is like supermarkets, you know, overrated. Just a lot of pushing and shoving and you still come out with very little at the end.”

        “Shirley Valentine” was nominated for

        two Academy Awards. Pauline Collins was nominated for Best Actress, but lost out to Jessica Tandy’s marvelous performance in “Driving Miss Daisy.” “Shirley Valentine” was also nominated for Best Original Score for the song “The Girl Who Used to Be Me” by Marvin Hamlisch, Alan Bergman, and Marilyn Bergman.

        “Shirley Valentine” reminds me of another Lewis Gilbert movie, “Educating Rita.” Ironically it also reminds me of “Driving Miss Daisy,” the movie that produced the winning Best Actress Oscar Collins competed for. In the nature of movies where women find themselves and grow into more complete richer persons I’m reminded of Jane Fonda in “Coming Home’ and Kathy Bates in “Fried Green Tomatoes”

        I liked this movie. It was good fun entertainment and well worth a look. I give it an 86% or a B.




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