TED Video Lectures
  • I like learning online for free and I especially like watching entertaining videos that give me a basic understanding of matters I am not too familiar with
  • Since TED's annual membership cost is about $6,000.00 and this is the only way to see the lectures live, these videos are a way to sample what the rich and smart folks go see
  • Each of these breaks down into more specific subthemes, so finding something good and interesting to watch is easy, even if you have never heard of some of these people
  • A few of the talks I particularly enjoyed (and I have enjoyed many) are '10 ways the world could end' by Stephen Petranek (former editor-in-chief of Discover magazine), 'Why we do what we do, and how we can do it better' by Tony Robbins (famous motivational speaker I love), 'Brain science is about to fundamentally change computing' by Jeff Hawkins (this one made me reexamine some of my core beliefs about the mind) and 'The Web's secret stories' by Jonathan Harris (this made me aware of how much information we give out on the Internet and what the good, the bad and the ugly out there can do with it)
  • I cannot recommend this site enough although I cannot give it a 10 because of the difficulty I have had playing the song

    • by Stumickel
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      I like learning online for free and I especially like watching entertaining videos that give me a basic understanding of matters I am not too familiar with. This is where TED’s video lectures, www.ted.com, shine.

      TED (’Technology, Entertainment, Design’) is a conference organization owned by The Sapling Foundation and devoted to ‘ideas worth spreading’ as given in its title. The videos that can be viewed for free on the site are presentations by famous and/or illustrious people given at TED’s normal annual conferences held at Monterey, California, and another series of Global conferences held every other year abroad. As given on the site, these people are what TED considers the ‘world’s smartest thinkers, greatest visionaries and most-inspiring teachers.’ They come from a wide variety of areas and include Nobel laureate Al Gore, Nobel laureate James D. Watson (Physiology or Medicine), Sergey Brin and


      Larry Page (Google founders), Jeff Bezos (Amazon founder), Richard Branson (Virgin founder), Richard Dawkins (best-selling evolutionary biologist), Peter Gabriel (solo musician artist and Genesis founder), Pastor Rick Warren (author of “The Purpose-Driven Life”), and a host of other brilliant human beings. TED also has a special merit prize it awards to people who have made a difference in changing the world. Bill Clinton and Bono are among those prize-winners.

      As of this writing, there are almost 150 videos available. The presentations have about a 20 minute maximum limit, although the time slot given for the speakers is 18 minutes. Since TED’s annual membership cost is about $6,000.00 and this is the only way to see the lectures live, these videos are a way to sample what the rich and smart folks go see. Getting them for free is simply a wonderful education ...


      • for the price of just watching.

        When you first go to the site, you can browse by ‘Theme,’ ‘Title Talk’ or ‘Speaker.’ If you choose ‘Theme,’ you are given the initial categories of technology, entertainment, design, business, science, culture, arts, global issues, or all. Each of these breaks down into more specific subthemes, so finding something good and interesting to watch is easy, even if you have never heard of some of these people.

        A few of the talks I particularly enjoyed (and I have enjoyed many) are ‘10 ways the world could end’ by Stephen Petranek (former editor-in-chief of Discover magazine), ‘Why we do what we do, and how we can do it better’ by Tony Robbins (famous motivational speaker I love), ‘Brain science is about to fundamentally change computing’ by Jeff Hawkins (this one made me reexamine some of my core beliefs

        about the mind) and ‘The Web’s secret stories’ by Jonathan Harris (this made me aware of how much information we give out on the Internet and what the good, the bad and the ugly out there can do with it). There is a lovely song I have tried to listen to several times, ‘Kiteflyer’s Hill’ sung by Eddi Reader, but something in the video skips on my computer’probably the video’s 25+ MB size.

        You can also see these videos on YouTube under the name of TEDtalksDirector and they are podcast in audio and video on iTunes.

        I cannot recommend this site enough although I cannot give it a 10 because of the difficulty I have had playing the song. If you think these talks are too brainy to be interesting to the average person, do like I did: watch one. You will think again.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2007. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 501812259470631/k2311a1218/12.18.07
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