Lost in Translation, movie (2003)  » Movies  »
5.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • But there comes a moment when he no longer feels happy
  • Of course, Charlotte does not feel lost, she has a husband, friends, but she is deliberately sad
  • She is bathed in her anticipation of the beautiful and seeks answers that will allow her to find herself
  • Murray's ability to silently portray the character's experience and reveal the surface is awe-inspiring in the absence of action
  • However, this role required her to play just a girl, perhaps not even to finish it


by GEORGE
TRUSTWORTHY

followers:3
follow
    Can a goodbye be happy? Not just leaving each other for a “see you soon” time, but a natural parting. When everyone understands that they are saying goodbye to a part of their life, saying goodbye to a piece of themselves, letting go of their love.
  • Lost in Translation, movie (2003)
  • One life, halfway through life, reaches certain heights, starts a family. But there comes a moment when he no longer feels happy. No, no grief has occurred, everything remains in its place, but his life no longer satisfies him.

    At the end of his acting career, Bob Harris gets a lucrative offer. He arrives in Tokyo to shoot a commercial for the whisky “Suntory.” But, most of the time, Bob is on his own. This makes him acutely feel an emptiness inside. His soul hurts; he can no longer taste life. It would seem that as a man ages, he finds solace in his loved ones. But neither his wife, nor his children, nor news from home pleases him.

  • Lost in Translation, movie (2003)
  • A similar case of a borderline state of mind is in the second character in the film, Charlotte. A young girl who graduated from Yale with a rich inner world, beauty, and intelligence came to Tokyo with her photographer husband. Her husband is engrossed in his work, and Charlotte tries to occupy herself: she walks around the city, visits a temple, is interested in the ikebana school. But nothing brings her joy, and even the monks cannot touch her soul with their singing.

    Charlotte is lucky. Finding herself in a massive metropolis with all the trappings of daily life stores, movies, clubs, crowds of people, the girl makes a choice and is alone. She can be envied. Destiny does not always give such an opportunity to be alone. To understand their desires, to see what was hidden behind the veil of ordinariness. Of course, Charlotte does not feel lost, she has a husband, friends, but she is deliberately “sad. There is no sadness or despair in her condition. She is bathed in her anticipation of the beautiful and seeks answers that will allow her to find herself.

  • Lost in Translation, movie (2003)
  • The film is set in Tokyo. It seems to me that Sofia Coppola deliberately transports the characters to a forbiddingly distant Japan, throwing them to the test of fate, isolating them from their usual affairs, from anything that might disturb their state of equilibrium. The film is captivating in its sadness; it is the mood that Sofia focuses on in her movie. Coppola skillfully reveals a touching story of two very different people. She brings her characters to the crossroads of fate, carefully prepares their meeting, and fondly frames their acquaintance.

    I really liked the selection of actors. Bill Murray fit perfectly into the character of Bob Harris, already not young, but highly attentive and lively, wise and pleasant in every way man. Murray’s ability to silently portray the character’s experience and reveal the surface is awe-inspiring in the absence of action.

  • Lost in Translation, movie (2003)
  • Scarlett Johansson is lovely. Because of her outward attractiveness, she perfectly carried the gentle image of Charlotte. However, this role required her to play just a girl, perhaps not even to finish it. The character should come out naturally, without the slightest hint of theatricality. I think Scarlett did very well.

    The film enchants with beauty and style. One can feel Sophia lovingly setting each scene. At first glance, one gets the impression that there is too much darkness in the film’s palette. Still, after watching the entire movie, I had nothing to complain about. In each new shot, the dark is gently diluted with whimsical oriental colors.

  • Lost in Translation, movie (2003)
  • One of the most beautiful moments is when Charlotte and Bob meet. They are sitting behind the bar, against the backdrop of the glowing neon advertisements of Tokyo at night. In another equally important moment, the characters watch TV, lie on the bed, and chat “about life.” The scene is very tender and infinitely beautiful. On a white pastel, Bob and Charlotte are in black, nothing superfluous. Bob completes the harmony of the stage. He touches Charlotte’s hand. Only love is “heard” in the silence.

    Yes, goodbye can be joyful and happy! But, Bob and Charlotte’s part, their “Japanese vacation” has come to an end, which means beginning a new stage of life ahead. Each of them has its own happy path. Lost in Translation is very gentle movie.



  • Sidenotes
    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2021. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 112071666330831/k2311a072/7.2.21
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy