Deoksugung Palace, Seoul, South Korea
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99 Sejong-daero, Jeong-dong, Jung-gu, Seoul, South Korea
  • I think this is a good place if you love to see a Korean palace but have no much time to spend for most you want to see in other Korean palaces you can see them here
  • I was surprised that they can maintain the buildings in every detail, for example the sleeping quarters, the throne hall, and the working place of the king to name some
  • Unfortunately there is no information about kinds of furniture used during the building served as the throne hall
  • Should you have limited time to spend, I recommend you to visit Deoksugung
  • But when I arrived at 8 pm they did not admit any new visitors


by Pusaka

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    I think this is a good place if you love to see a Korean palace but have no much time to spend for most you want to see in other Korean palaces you can see them here. The size is also small so you can explore it in less than 60 minutes. But it is better to allow at least 90 minutes optimizing your visit.

    First is the admission fee. It is 1,000 Korean won (about a dollar) for adults, 500 won for children and free for seniors of 65 and above. Having passed the main gate you will enter the time tunnel back to hundreds of years ago. I was surprised that they can maintain the buildings in every detail, for example the sleeping quarters, the throne hall, and the working place of the king to name some. This palace had been the residence of three kings or even more. I was even more stunned to see two western-style buildings within the premise. Although both were constructed later they were completed in the Korean Kingdom period. The king was used to spend his time here. At the back of the premise there is a small but beautiful garden. When I visited this place in summer 2018, it still felt cool there.

    Three times a day they organize guard changing ceremony in the front of the main entrance. It is carried out in exactly the same way as it used to be. But today the ceremony is equipped with oral information in multiple languages, Korean, English, Chinese, and Japanese, for explanations for foreign visitors. This place is really worth a visit. Moreover it is free to watch the ceremony.

    Pic Untitled Main entrance. The Chinese characters read Daehanmun in Korean or the Great Han Gate. It is the main entrance to this small but beautiful palace of Deoksugung in Seoul. Like other palaces in Seoul, it is today surrounded by modern buildings.

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • The throne hall. It is now an empty space on both the left and right of the throne. Unfortunately there is no information about kinds of furniture used during the building served as the throne hall.

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • Jeukjodang. This is the building where both King Gwanghaegun and King In-Jo ascended to the throne. But again it is now just an empty space. They can organize a very good reenactment of the Guard Changing Ceremony, why do not they provide a picture of the coronation here?

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • East meets West. One of the western style buildings in Deoksugung, the Seokjojeon. It has western architecture in both the exterior and interior making you forget that you are in Korea.

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • Main entrance. The Chinese characters read Daehanmun in Korean or the Great Han Gate. It is the main entrance to this small but beautiful palace of Deoksugung in Seoul. Like other palaces in Seoul, it is today surrounded by modern buildings.

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • Guard Changing Ceremony. Fortunately I could watch the reenactment of Guard Changing Ceremony that day as in the afternoon there was a political demonstration in the very same place. The ceremony is not as big as in Gyeongbokgung, but the details are not distinguishable.

  • Deoksugung Palace
  • Political demonstration in front of Deksugung.

    I have visited other palaces in Seoul. Here is the comparison between them. Deoksugung charges the cheapest entrance fee and has western style buildings within its premise. Although Unhyeongung applies free admission and twice a year they organize the reenactment of the wedding ceremony of King Gojong and Queen Myeongsong, the premise itself is very small. Gyeongbokgung is the largest palace, while Changdeokgung has a huge garden with separate entrance fee. Should you have limited time to spend, I recommend you to visit Deoksugung. Apart from what I wrote above, I understand that this palace is the only one that is open to public in the evening until 9 pm. But when I arrived at 8 pm they did not admit any new visitors.



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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2018. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 385071663960431/k2311a075/7.5.18
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