Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
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  • It tells the story of a recent high school graduate Casey (Haley Lu Richardson) who is an architecture nerd that refuses to go to college because she wants to take care of her recovering mother (Parker Posey)
  • One day, an Architecture theorist visits the town for a lecture but unfortunately suffered illness which results to the arrival of his son Jin (John Cho)
  • Stuck in this vast architectural town these two people meet and talk about their lives, problems, architecture, parents, school, and all sorts
  • It is slow at first but once these two characters become comfortable with each other the conversations become very interesting
  • The conversations flow perfectly in this amazing piece of screenplay


by Laudemhir Jan Parel

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    “Every frame a painting,” is a term that could be aptly applied to this movie. And awhile its fairly static camera movement could mean a slow-burning calorie to be devoured by any human being watching this, the results are staggering. This is a widely-fleshed drama of two suffering characters trying to piece their lives back together in the city of Columbus, Indiana - their bodies as facade and their stories the foundation of architectural triumph.
  • Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
  • Columbus is the debut feature directed by Kogonada - himself a renowned film analyst. It tells the story of a recent high school graduate Casey (Haley Lu Richardson) who is an architecture nerd that refuses to go to college because she wants to take care of her recovering mother (Parker Posey). So she works in the local library and wishes to become a tour guide in her architectural town. One day, an Architecture theorist visits the town for a lecture but unfortunately suffered illness which results to the arrival of his son Jin (John Cho).

  • Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
  • Stuck in this vast architectural town these two people meet and talk about their lives, problems, architecture, parents, school, and all sorts. Their connection tightens, characterized by the architectural landscape that shaped their mutual understanding for each other.

  • Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
  • Mind you, this is a very dialogue-driven movie. It is slow at first but once these two characters become comfortable with each other the conversations become very interesting. It’s hard not to fall in love with these two struggling human souls, one who does not want to move out of town because of her problematic mother (even though she has the intellectual knack few people her age have) and one who has trouble reconciling with his father. There are little romantic undertones that not only spark their chemistry but also make you fall in love with them naturally and not in an obvious way. That’s the work of a great script or screenplay.

  • Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
  • Most of these could be attributed to the flawless performances of its actors. The handsome John Cho expresses no regret in his hatred but you still like his character because you can easily empathize with him. When he says, “I’m sorry I’m having a bad day… or year,” you suddenly understand why he is what he is. But the true winner is newcomer Haley Lu Richardson (whose previous popular movie was Split). This is her first leading role and she nails it out of the ballpark. Occasionally poignant but intellectually composed, her love for architecture and her inner sense of seeing things differently than others will make you sympathize with her character. Everyone can relate to her “fear of moving away” when she was asked why she doesn’t want to go to college. Obviously they are the two main cast but the whole ensemble delivered a perfect job.

  • Columbus (2017 Drama Film)
  • But the real winner of course is director Kogonada. It’s hard to imagine that in his directorial debut he already has the eye of a real auteur. Every shot is framed carefully, not only will these images make you wow but it will make you appreciate architecture and art a bit more than you do. I wish I had his eyes in seeing buildings more than they supposed to, that somehow as the film says, “architecture has the power to heal”. The result is outstanding.

    All in all, nothing can be really fault in this debut feature. The conversations flow perfectly in this amazing piece of screenplay; the images magnetically attracts its viewers’ eyes to keep looking and marveling at them; the performances are so good its hard not to fall in love; the direction so near damn flawless that by the end it makes you sad that it is over already. It’s a revealing wonder.



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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in December, 2017. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 115121661520431/k2311a125/12.5.17
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